Jump to content

Cre8asiteforums Internet Marketing
and Conversion Web Design


Photo

Adobe to aquire Macromedia!


  • Please log in to reply
40 replies to this topic

#1 DaveChild

DaveChild

    Honored One Who Served Moderator Alumni

  • Hall Of Fame
  • 3446 posts

Posted 18 April 2005 - 04:43 AM

http://news.google.c...dobe macromedia

Now that I didn't see coming. I wonder what kind of impact this will have on web design!

#2 bwelford

bwelford

    Peacekeeper Administrator

  • Site Administrators
  • 9011 posts

Posted 18 April 2005 - 05:25 AM

I think that's akin to Compaq acquiring Hewlett Packard (except in real life it was the reverse way round). Or perhaps Mamma.com acquiring Copernic: oops that one fell out of bed. Oh if only corporate managements would realize that growing bigger isn't the same thing as growing better.

#3 Tangaroa

Tangaroa

    Light Speed Member

  • Members
  • 513 posts

Posted 18 April 2005 - 06:12 AM

I wonder what kind of impact this will have on web design!


I guess only time will tell. Some apps will be merged into the Adobe range or disappear completely.

The main areas of overlap between the companies' products are in graphics, where Adobe's Photoshop and Illustrator are the market leaders ahead of Macromedia's competing Fireworks and Freehand.


So I guess Photoshop and Illustrator will stay and the development of the original Macromedia products will come to an end.

However, the situation with Flash could change: Adobe has invested heavily in SVG for Web graphics, and some Web developers see a combination of SVG and scripting as a standards-based alternative to Flash. Adobe has produced an SVG browser plug-in, and includes SVG authoring capabilities in GoLive


This could be a tricky one. However I don't know the numbers on the use of Flash and SVG...

Source: uk.builder.com

#4 wiser3

wiser3

    Gravity Master Member

  • Members
  • 227 posts

Posted 18 April 2005 - 07:51 AM

I preorder my Adobe Creative Suite 2 on Friday. Then Monday i find that Adobe is buying Macromedia. Wow, i'm shocked.

Clearly it will take time for them to decide what products to drop and how to upgrade or integrate the remaining ones. The next creative suite upgrade could have a strange new look to it.

#5 Adrian

Adrian

    Honored One Who Served Moderator Alumni

  • Invited Users For Labs
  • 5779 posts

Posted 18 April 2005 - 08:03 AM

Bah, beat me by a couple hours Dave, and I didnt see this thread.
Linked to a few articles in the Tech News Forum at http://www.cre8asite...showtopic=23734 :)

#6 TheManBehindTheCurtain

TheManBehindTheCurtain

    Time Traveler Member

  • 1000 Post Club
  • 1035 posts

Posted 18 April 2005 - 09:10 AM

IMHO, very very bad news.

Macromedia is a smart, dynamic company brimming with people who understand their customers, understand the technology, and deliver top-notch products that really do what you need them to do. I buy their products because I truly like them. (Dreamweaver, Flash, Director back in the good old days.)

Adobe is a conservative, plodding company that too often puts company priorities above customer satisfaction. (Small example: an absolutely customer-hostile upgrade experience. And $150 for a .0x release of Photoshop.) I buy their products only because I have to have them. (Photoshop, Acrobat)

I fear for what this means for the Macromedia product line. A company like Adobe can suck all of the innovation out of a product line and drive out the vitality of its management.

Pardon me while I go lock myself in a closet and scream obscenities for a few minutes.

#7 Black_Phoenix

Black_Phoenix

    Honored One Who Served Moderator Alumni

  • Hall Of Fame
  • 1269 posts

Posted 18 April 2005 - 10:30 AM

Thanks for the heads up on that, I also am quite worried as to what Adobe will do regarding the Macromedia lines, I use Photoshop and illustrator rather than freehand, so thats not too bad, but I dont like golive and prefer to use dreamweaver. I cant see them withdrawing the range (i hope they dont anyway). With regards to flash I cant see they will get rid of it, at a guess they will just take on Macromedias existing programming people and continue to build new versions.

Macromedia is a smart, dynamic company brimming with people who understand their customers,


I fully agree with you regarding Macromedias support and customer services, being excellent. just hope that Adobe take on the existing Macromedia staff.

I cant see them making all the changes overnight, design firms I have worked for usually have versions of both brands products, so that will save some big design companies some money. I guess only time will tell

bp

#8 DaveChild

DaveChild

    Honored One Who Served Moderator Alumni

  • Hall Of Fame
  • 3446 posts

Posted 18 April 2005 - 10:57 AM

Thinking about this through the day, I think it makes a lot of sense for Adobe. There's a lot of opportunity for integration - especially with Flash. I think they'll keep on Dreamweaver, though might look to a future version to combine that and GoLive into a new product.

I think freehand might be a lost cause though. Not that that bothers me - I still use Xara X :)

#9 AbleReach

AbleReach

    Peacekeeper Administrator

  • Site Administrators
  • 6467 posts

Posted 18 April 2005 - 11:43 AM

Hey, I still miss Allaire, uhhhh, and when Bradsoft owned Homesite...

I don't like conglomeration.


Elizabeth

#10 TheManBehindTheCurtain

TheManBehindTheCurtain

    Time Traveler Member

  • 1000 Post Club
  • 1035 posts

Posted 18 April 2005 - 12:59 PM

I'm not too worried, personally, about which product lines live or die because I think the "winners" are pretty clear. What very much worries me is the significant difference in the way the two companies relate to customers.

I see Macromedia as very customer-driven, energetic, innovative, and just plain enthusiastic in the way it develops and promotes and supports its products.

In Adobe I see a very profits-driven company, lethargic, conservative, and prone compromise on customer satisfaction when they know they're in a commanding enough position to do so.

In mergers, it's rare that two corporate cultures blend and emerge as a newer, stronger culture. Too often one culture eventually overwhelms and subsumes the other. I fear that a few years down the road we'll recognize that the values we loved in Macromedia have been extinguished by Adobe.

F.

#11 thirstymoose_2000

thirstymoose_2000

    Mach 1 Member

  • Members
  • 268 posts

Posted 18 April 2005 - 02:16 PM

Guess they got tired of suing each other :)

#12 TheManBehindTheCurtain

TheManBehindTheCurtain

    Time Traveler Member

  • 1000 Post Club
  • 1035 posts

Posted 18 April 2005 - 02:58 PM

;)

#13 invader

invader

    Mach 1 Member

  • Members
  • 440 posts

Posted 18 April 2005 - 03:18 PM

A move more motivated by fear than any other claimed BS.

#14 Claude_2

Claude_2

    Ready To Fly Member

  • Members
  • 19 posts

Posted 18 April 2005 - 03:34 PM

It must be my luck, after we finished implementing Groove into the proccess I see an announcement that it was bought by microsoft; ok no problem I say, we'll find another solution, as mkrsoft will do one of those hybrid products that does it all but finally it does nothing.
Now, after using Macromedia's products I find that they'll pass on everything to Adobe - boom again because Adobe even if it doesn't kill Dreamweaver/Flash/Fireworks it will surely change something in them, and boy do I really want to wait until Dreamweaver starts as you have to wait until one of Adobe's products starts (after loading all those billion plugins and patents and so on...).

Anyway, what's the next thing; Microsoft buying Yahoo, Adobe aquiring Corel too and heading for what's left...this just makes me think of Digital River

#15 puntyup

puntyup

    Ready To Fly Member

  • Members
  • 11 posts

Posted 18 April 2005 - 08:50 PM

Well I only see this as bad news if the deal goes through.

Lack of competition is never a good thing in the market place.
Expect to see higher prices, less innovation and more bloat ware.

I have never been a fan of Adobe customer service, the only great product they have is Photoshop and that was developed by a couple of ILM wizbang graphic guys. Well their Fonts are great, but thats where they started-- they should be.

I am sure we will hear the corporate speak about how they will merge the products and take the best of both to create super duper new versions. But that seldom happens, say goodbye to Freehand, say goodbye to Fireworks. Expect to see photoshop lite or image ready as part of Dreamweaver.

But don't expect much innovation from Adobe - Look at Premiere they basically had the low-end desktop video market locked up, but they sat on their hands for years with BS upgrades. You could not even sync sound accurately in Premier at version 6. Apple comes along with FinalCut Pro and its all over.

Look at the program Pagemaker a great program that was originally made by Aldus and bought by Adobe, Pagemaker had a dominant position in the market. They did nothing with that product for years, even when they could have been on top of the desktop publishing market due to Quark's complete mismanagement. Years later they have done pretty well with InDesign, but only because Quark did everything wrong.

I just don't see them as being very good corporate parents to products they have bought in the past. I think this is more of a "eliminate the competition" move than it is some synergistic two products are better than one strategy.

Maybe we will get lucky and the FTC will give them a thumbs down.

#16 AbleReach

AbleReach

    Peacekeeper Administrator

  • Site Administrators
  • 6467 posts

Posted 19 April 2005 - 02:30 AM

Maybe we will get lucky and the FTC will give them a thumbs down.

On one hand, I have no doubt that Macrodobe? Adomedia? will spawn beautiful or at least interesting children. On the other, is there another major player in graphics programs? Does PSP get a boost from the merger?

Microsoft is competing for the web design seat.
Other than FP, Macromedia and maybe GoLive, what major branded players make web sites?

Thinking back, Ulead used to be bigger for graphics, didn't it? HotDog (www.sausage.com) used to be bigger, Coffee Cup is still hanging on, but neither (?) are setting the world on fire within their companies or with a cadre of users. I've been out of it for a while -- is there something new and powerful that happened when I was in my cave?

AFIK there are quality, active free/donationware or open source communities (1stpage, htmlkit, etc,) but not a lot between there and the powerhouse branded html applications.

I think the lack of a range of branded choices probably makes new online business owners more vulnerable to either the dreaded faceless online sitebuilder or shelling out bucks for something software that they don't really need while still developing content and identity. They'll look for trustworthy brands ($$$$) and may or may not get to networking with folks who have been around longer or get pointed towards something to do in between having a dream and being able to hire a pro. And, this is probably going to be an opportunity for FP. Just my HO.

The growing hole between open source communities and big bucks branded players worries me. Jeez - why? Opportunities for new designers and new businesses? Fancy that.


Elizabeth

#17 Tangaroa

Tangaroa

    Light Speed Member

  • Members
  • 513 posts

Posted 19 April 2005 - 10:23 AM

Guess they got tired of suing each other


If you can't beat them...buy them? :)
(The MS way...)

#18 ukdaz

ukdaz

    Light Speed Member

  • Members
  • 738 posts

Posted 19 April 2005 - 12:33 PM

Bugger!

I just upgraded to Photoshop CS AND Dreamweaver MX 2004 last Friday.

Myabe could have made done with what I had but thought it best to upgrade - wish I had known this on Friday. Just hope I haven't wasted money! :)

Daz

#19 TheManBehindTheCurtain

TheManBehindTheCurtain

    Time Traveler Member

  • 1000 Post Club
  • 1035 posts

Posted 19 April 2005 - 02:47 PM

Last I read, the deal won't close till August or September, pending regulatory review and stockholder approval. It will take some months after that for business unit consolidation (read: layoffs) and pricing and licensing review, so I'd guess your investment is good till 2006 or therabouts.

But don't look for any deals. If anything, you might look to stock up on closeouts. With Fireworks dead, what is the new "fair" price of Photoshop without high-end competition beyond PaintShop Pro? With GoLive turned into GoDead, what's the asking price for "Adobe Dreamweaver"? Where's the competitive price pressure? No where.

As they say, bend over and grab your checkbook.

#20 DianeV

DianeV

    Honored One Who Served Moderator Alumni

  • Hall Of Fame
  • 7216 posts

Posted 19 April 2005 - 06:10 PM

Maybe so, and I think we have plenty of reason to be wary or nervous over huge changes to companies that provide the software we depend upon.

On the other hand, when I bought the upgrade to Adobe Creative Suite (the Photoshop upgrade plus whole versions of Illustrator and InDesign) for less than the cost of Illustrator, I was told by an Adobe phone rep that the reason they were offering the package was that they'd found that most of their customers had Photoshop, and they wanted to "give our customers a break".

The merger may give us something better; it may give us something worse. I do know that Photoshop CS/ImageReady enables saving layered files as Flash files, so that may be where Adobe is trying to go. However, this is speculation; the problem is that we don't know what will happen.

My thought is that, if I want any more Macromedia products now, it's time to buy them before the purchase/merger goes through; those products will at least last us some time.

#21 TheManBehindTheCurtain

TheManBehindTheCurtain

    Time Traveler Member

  • 1000 Post Club
  • 1035 posts

Posted 19 April 2005 - 11:29 PM

....I was told by an Adobe phone rep that the reason they were offering the package was that they'd found that most of their customers had Photoshop, and they wanted to "give our customers a break".


Yes, that sounds so much better than "We want to give you the first one free, and once you're hooked, sell you expensive upgrade after expensive upgrade." :) By the way, Diane, I own some real estate down in Florida that I think you may be interested in. Prime location. Good drainage. ;) ;)

I don't want to sound too much like I'm an Adobe-basher. I wouldn't use anything but Photoshop. As long as there was Macromedia, I thought there was balance in the world and I was OK. A world without Macromedia though ... I just have to admit I'm downright bummed out.

Yeah, I'm hoping they ship Flash 8 before the merger closes. I'll plunk down some bucks for the "last of the line."

#22 wiser3

wiser3

    Gravity Master Member

  • Members
  • 227 posts

Posted 20 April 2005 - 08:45 AM

With GoLive turned into GoDead, what's the asking price for "Adobe Dreamweaver"?


I also frequent forums at Adobe, MM, and a few others places. I'm amazed at how many people think GoLive will die. The only people that think DW will die instead of GoLive are in the MM forums!

I make a living using GoLive and have already ordered the CS2 upgrade of the entire creative suite. GoLive may not have the market share DW has, but that doesn't mean it isn't better in a lot of ways. GoLive has much better CSS support, site management, and i greatly prefer the familiar Adobe interface. GoLive's big weakness is dynamic content support, which i hand code and have built up a library of php scripts that fulfill my needs.

BTW, i do also have DW, because i took over some sites originally done with it. The more i use DW the more i prefer GoLive. I find that those bashing GoLive have never really used it.

I'd like to see DW's dynamic content support and plug-ins support be added to GoLive.

#23 DianeV

DianeV

    Honored One Who Served Moderator Alumni

  • Hall Of Fame
  • 7216 posts

Posted 20 April 2005 - 02:01 PM

wiser3, you may be right. I've not used GoLive though I did try it years ago. As I recall, it generated piles of pretty odd proprietary code at the time, but things may be different now.

LOL, Frank. Nearly every software company releases upgrades at some point. Remember Dreamweaver4 to Dreamweaver MX to Dreamweaver MX 2004? The MX-to-MX2004 sequence was pretty fast. I'm guessing part of the reason for DWMX2004 was to fix the problems reported in the DW newsgroup. I should add that I've been a HomeSite/DW user for years, and love the products.

With Adobe, I'm happy enough to have obtained the Photoshop-upgrade/Illustrator/InDesign package offered to Photoshop owners only at a ridiculously low price. So while it may have been a clever ploy to trick me into an upgrade sales cycle (to which I was already subject with Photoshop), the end result was a purchase of the Photoshop CS upgrade ($169) plus Illustrator ($500-ish) and InDesign ($699 USD) for $549 rather than the full $1368 price.

#24 thirstymoose_2000

thirstymoose_2000

    Mach 1 Member

  • Members
  • 268 posts

Posted 20 April 2005 - 02:33 PM

Tried Golive years ago hated it --- stuck with Dreamweaver. Admit that I haven't tried a newer version of it though.

#25 DianeV

DianeV

    Honored One Who Served Moderator Alumni

  • Hall Of Fame
  • 7216 posts

Posted 20 April 2005 - 02:36 PM

I think many of us are worried over Adobe's proposed Macromedia buyout.

If it happens, and if Adobe is clever, they'll integrate the two products to be backwards compatible. That's a lot of ifs.

I'm not a print person, but it reminds me of the story told to me recently: that Quark was so difficult to use that it took people years to learn/find workarounds/whatever. Thus, when a new and (I'm guessing) improved version of Quark was FINALLY issued, users did not flock to upgrade. End of story. Meanwhile, Adobe comes out with InDesign, and printers are (from my limited experience, to be sure) beginning to accept InDesign files.

On the other hand, the "deal" still has to obtain government approval in order to take place because the combined company would have a huge share of the marketplace for various products. This is where it could get interesting, because there's only one company that has enough of a share of the market as well as the ability to bark loudly, and that's Microsoft. I can see it now: Microsoft complaining at the proposed creation of what amounts to a monopoly.

Stuff happens. We're not dead in the water yet.

#26 bwelford

bwelford

    Peacekeeper Administrator

  • Site Administrators
  • 9011 posts

Posted 20 April 2005 - 03:59 PM

I'm still wondering whether it has any particular merit for any stakeholders other than the Adobe management. It may be that it's all explained by the 'bigger is better' kind of mentality. As I explain in my blog, it may be just another of these marriages of convenience like HP & Compaq or Mamma.com & Copernic. Thankfully the latter has been halted at the altar given the unsavoury nature of the bridegroom, although I guess innocence should be assumed until guilt is proven.

#27 DianeV

DianeV

    Honored One Who Served Moderator Alumni

  • Hall Of Fame
  • 7216 posts

Posted 20 April 2005 - 06:56 PM

> I'm still wondering whether it has any particular merit for any stakeholders other than the Adobe management.

I have to say I've wondered lately what people meant by the word "stakeholders", as it could have several meanings.

At any rate, the problem is that there are products that -- without arguing pros/cons and better/worse issues -- do the same thing, and Adobe has said that it "will identify opportunities for cost savings by the time the acquisition closes" (Adobe press release). This could easily mean, among other things, getting rid of overlapping programs. If this is the case, it would seem that, for starters, either of Dreamweaver/GoLive and Fireworks/Photoshop are immediate contenders for the axe, and this is at least one factor that's causing distress in the design community.

#28 TheManBehindTheCurtain

TheManBehindTheCurtain

    Time Traveler Member

  • 1000 Post Club
  • 1035 posts

Posted 20 April 2005 - 11:33 PM

I lament what it means for innovation.

Remember when FrontPage was the top HTML editing program? Dreamweaver was a breath of fresh air and blew FP off the map. GoLive has always, IMHO, been a day late and a dollar short.

The web revolution was happening fast and furious and Photoshop languished in the print age. Along came Fireworks, and suddenly Photoshop came into the 20th (then 21st) century with ImageReady.

Compare Flash of 1997 (a web animation tool) with Flash of 2005 (a web-based multimedia development platform).

So, I'll admit, I did some contract work very briefly for Macromedia back in the mid-1990s. The people were gifted and motivated and ... just plain interesting. I guess that makes me biased.

Still, I have to submit there's room for honest concern about what we'll be missing out on without competition to spur innovation. Macromedia was simply the smarter and more energized company, and they made everyone work harder to compete. Big win for us consumers. Without Macromedia around, I see the pace of innovation slowing and higher prices as Adobe tries to recoup its investment in a market where it has the only serious high-end professional tool set.

Gawd, I have to stop posting on this thread. I just keep talking myself into being more and more depressed.

But one last thing. "Opportunities for cost savings" is even more insidious than it sounds, because it's not just about consolidating a product line. Entire product teams will eventually be laid off. That's a shame too.

#29 DianeV

DianeV

    Honored One Who Served Moderator Alumni

  • Hall Of Fame
  • 7216 posts

Posted 21 April 2005 - 01:44 AM

I read it the same way, Frank: that people and products will be cut. Whether those will be Adobe's or Macromedia's remains to be seen.

Your close experience with Macromedia sounds wonderful; must have been great!

I'm hoping that the need to keep us all on that upgrade cycle continues to spur innovation, even in the absence of heavy-hitter competitors. However, I'm wondering whether this particular buyout will pass the SEC test.

At any rate, I guess I'll be buying whatever Macromedia software I want before the big day.

#30 DianeV

DianeV

    Honored One Who Served Moderator Alumni

  • Hall Of Fame
  • 7216 posts

Posted 28 December 2005 - 06:39 PM

Sorry (sort of) to resurrect this thread. Since Adobe has now acquired Macromedia, and since many of the design/developer community (including myself) have serious concerns about how various Macromedia products will be treated, I've been posting about it on my blog.

Amazingly, someone from Adobe responded.

See also John Dowdell's blog: JD on [TBD]

#31 AbleReach

AbleReach

    Peacekeeper Administrator

  • Site Administrators
  • 6467 posts

Posted 28 December 2005 - 08:18 PM

Good to hear that Dreamweaver is alive and well.

Diane, your concept of using Flash as an illustration in a pdf is trés cool. :-)

E

#32 DianeV

DianeV

    Honored One Who Served Moderator Alumni

  • Hall Of Fame
  • 7216 posts

Posted 28 December 2005 - 09:06 PM

> Diane, your concept of using Flash as an illustration in a pdf is trés cool. :-)

Yes, wouldn't that be something? I was hoping, from one of the press release types of info Adobe issued, that that's what they had in mind. Not sure about it -- but it would be fantastic. Think: ebooks, with Flash illustrations. Or band press releases with a bit of music. Or I don't know what else. Don't know if it's in the works but I thought that putting the idea out there might be interesting.

#33 vicky123

vicky123

    Gravity Master Member

  • Members
  • 115 posts

Posted 04 January 2006 - 05:43 AM

:rofl: Adobe Illustrator + Macromedia Freehand = Adobe Frustrator :rofl:

who knows!!
We will have eraser tool, filters, channels and all those things in flash now!!

Vicky ... :flowers:

Edited by vicky123, 04 January 2006 - 05:44 AM.


#34 TheManBehindTheCurtain

TheManBehindTheCurtain

    Time Traveler Member

  • 1000 Post Club
  • 1035 posts

Posted 04 January 2006 - 10:48 AM

> Diane, your concept of using Flash as an illustration in a pdf is trés cool. :-)

Yes, wouldn't that be something?  ... (snip)


It shouldn't be that hard. For example, even today you can embed a Flash file in a PowerPoint slide. Why not also embed QuickTime, MP3, etc. into PDF as well.

Think about it this way: PDF is a "print player" in the same way a web browser is an "HTML player." They are both display engines, but the browser aggregates external media (HTML, graphics, video, Flash, etc.) and the PDF "compiles" them into a single programmatic blob.

With Acrobat, you'd need some options. For example, the option to embed a player (like the Flash player/plugin) within the PDF or to use the player/plugin that's onboard on the local computer where the PDF is opened. Or the option to embed the media (the individual SWF) or to link to an external one.

Browsers and HTML suck at fine typography but excel at displaying animation through Flash. PDFs are static but can present beautifully typeset and paginated text. The convergence of the two is a natural progression. The same is already possible by combining several media already (think: multimedia CD) but this should open up more tools for authors and provide a much more accessible carrier medium.

#35 TheManBehindTheCurtain

TheManBehindTheCurtain

    Time Traveler Member

  • 1000 Post Club
  • 1035 posts

Posted 06 January 2006 - 03:52 PM

Here's more on the potential convergence of PDF and Flash:

Lynda Weinman on What's Next for Flash in 2006

It is likely that Flash will be able to be integrated into PDF, which will give the PDF format a huge increase in functionality. Interactive PDFs are currently clunky and limited in features. PDF could become a Trojan horse to deliver Flash as a document exchange format, rather than a device delivery format. This could be a way to distribute desktop applications in a seamless and compelling manner. Recent announcements at conferences, on Macromedia blogs, and on Macromedia Labs describe a new product—code-named Apollo—which looks to be the basis for the next generation PDF/Flash product.



#36 DianeV

DianeV

    Honored One Who Served Moderator Alumni

  • Hall Of Fame
  • 7216 posts

Posted 07 January 2006 - 04:02 AM

Nice. Kind of takes my breath away. Thank you for that, Frank.

I was checking InDesign help files; it appears that PDF can already contain movies and sound. I'm going to have to look at how that's done.

However, using Flash (which can contain multiple layers *and* interactivity) would be an even more preferable format.

I can see what my future will encompass. :)

Edited by DianeV, 07 January 2006 - 04:03 AM.


#37 manager

manager

    Time Traveler Member

  • 1000 Post Club
  • 1331 posts

Posted 10 January 2006 - 07:17 AM

Hi,

Just another view

I feel sorry for the employees involved in mergers, it must be a time of great uncertainty. I once worked as a network administrator for a large organisation that was acquired. I received a list of user accounts to lock out. I knew the people on the list were not going to have a job, before they did.

It is customary to dismiss some IT employees with little or no notice, and pay them for their notice period. This is to prevent disgruntled employees from sabotaging systems, or playing little tricks prior to departure :) .

TreV

#38 Shanada

Shanada

    Ready To Fly Member

  • Members
  • 30 posts

Posted 10 January 2006 - 09:51 AM

It is customary to dismiss some IT employees with little or no notice, and pay them for their notice period. This is to prevent disgruntled employees from sabotaging systems, or playing little tricks prior to departure :) .

TreV

View Post


Lol, yeah, general rule of business is not to anger the guys running the network and pcs, the people at a company I jobshadowed kept on angering the network admin (well, anger isn't the word, it's not strong enough), who proceeded to cause chaos for them. It was fun watching him subtly get back at them by doing things like delaying emails, restricting bandwidth, playing havoc with office politics (two ladies there hated a 3rd one, so the nasty emails about her mysterious got routed to the 3rd one, etc, etc) etc, etc :)

Edited by Shanada, 10 January 2006 - 09:58 AM.


#39 bwelford

bwelford

    Peacekeeper Administrator

  • Site Administrators
  • 9011 posts

Posted 24 March 2006 - 01:57 PM

Check out the Forbes article today, Adobe's Chizen Keeps His Chin Up.

The bottom line seems to be "Don't worry about the present, we have a glorious future." The problem is that, particularly in such a situation, it's going to be the very short term considerations relating to today's share price that will determine how long-term strategic decisions are actually taken.

#40 Black_Phoenix

Black_Phoenix

    Honored One Who Served Moderator Alumni

  • Hall Of Fame
  • 1269 posts

Posted 24 March 2006 - 06:19 PM

I think its a good move if they do slow down the updates, where we are now with programs you can create almost anything using the existing ones (as long as you have some talent)

I was impressed with Macromedia's price change update to studio 8 of a set price regardless of what previous version you are running, it used to be update from 4 to to MX to MX2 then... (costing a fortune, when all the upgrades were added together)

I still run Dreamweaver 4 on this machine, I have the lovely shiny studio 8 CD within 3 feet of me, but I dont have time to learn and get used to all the new things at the moment. I have installed Flash Pro, needed that for a job, but even that has changed quite a bit, from version 5.

Maybe i'm getting old :) or I need more free time :)

Should be interesting to see what Adobe does over the next few years.

bp



RSS Feed

0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users