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#41 Advisor

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Posted 08 May 2006 - 11:24 AM

I'd love to see a study on who would buy from a mystery site? Men or women.


Neither. Well just the dumb ones from either gender! :)

#42 dgeary9

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Posted 08 May 2006 - 11:40 AM

I'm usually not big on gender stereotyping, but I do have one great example.

A client of mine runs a high-end spa. This past Christmas was their first season selling gift certificates, which drive a goodly proportion of spa annual revenue. I was monitoring online & offline ordering behaviors. Most of the year, the visitors to this website are largely female (potential customers reading about services).

About 3 weeks before Christmas, the "careful" shoppers arrived - they looked around, compared options, purchased gift certificates - these shoppers were about 40% female, 60% male. Over the next two weeks, the proportion got increasingly male, but still looked around (viewed several options and pages before buying).

Then the Monday before Christmas hit, and what I dubbed the "oh s**T, it's Christmas!!" shoppers arrived. They viewed 1 page (the three holiday specials), were in and out of the site in less than 60 seconds, and converted in DROVES. 98% guys. It was absolutely hilarious to watch. Same thing happened offline - panicked guys walked in the spa door and would literally buy the first thing they saw.

Don't get me wrong, there were still women shopping last minute - but they still shopped (you know, compared options, read a little, etc). I could look at the behavior of an individual shopper in the few days before Christmas and predict their gender with really high accuracy, which wasn't true earlier in the season.

Anyhow, my real life example.... We are seriously working on the "oh s**T, it's Christmas" navigation path through the store for next year.

#43 DonnaFontenot

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Posted 08 May 2006 - 01:51 PM

Very interesting thread, and one that has my mind buzzing with ideas.

About 3/4 of my sites are geared toward women simply because they are topics that women are most interested in. I've used that to focus on the design of the site, but haven't considered many of the other things mentioned here (such as non-linear paths). Now, I have lots of thinking to do.

A few of my sites are geared towards children - about 5th grade level. I wonder if there are any studies or stats I should know about that would make a difference in how I guide them through the sites. Hmmm...

Off to do some thinking...

#44 JohnMu

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Posted 08 May 2006 - 01:58 PM

Then the Monday before Christmas hit, and what I dubbed the "oh s**T, it's Christmas!!" shoppers arrived. They viewed 1 page (the three holiday specials), were in and out of the site in less than 60 seconds, and converted in DROVES. 98% guys. It was absolutely hilarious to watch. Same thing happened offline - panicked guys walked in the spa door and would literally buy the first thing they saw.

I wonder if I'm the only one that has decided to keep or raise prices for the christmas-time? I see this pattern everywhere, even when selling such boring things as administrative software. Last year we decided to do our specials beginning November and not before christmas -- we had approx. the same number of sales before christmas but of course higher earnings :). Those panicked guys who've put off buying something but suddenly want it for the holidays are soooo predictable (okok, that matches me as well :D)

John

#45 Guest_scottiecl_*

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Posted 08 May 2006 - 03:26 PM

A funny example was a website review I did at our seminar.

It was for plastic surgery, supposedly designed for "mommies". What a great idea, I thought when the participant explained it to me. Most women who have had kids could probably use a nip and a tuck somewhere, why not target them and tell them it's OK to do something to make themselves feel better?

Then we pulled up the site. It was a guy's fantasy of p*rn models and the very few "before" and "after" pics didn't really need plastic surgery in the first place. The girls in the photos were tan, fit, and barely 20 if even that old. The example surgeries were minor at best.

Honestly, it was a woman's nightmare of plastic surgery examples... "it won't do you any good unless you really don't need it anyway". Just about every woman in the room was hostile about the site when I asked for opinions, some were even offended.

You'd think that would get the designer's attention, but he said it was exactly what the customer wanted and they were very pleased with it.

As I told him, you won't find many women who identify themselves as "mommy" first and foremost who wear tiny gold bikinis and want a half-inch tummy tuck and an extra cup size on the top.

The site was clearly a male fantasy or designed for women who spend all their time worrying about their looks and starring in their own webcam shows... if that's his target audience, he got the look right. However the copy and the URL talked about how hard it was being a mommy and how wonderful it was to eat like a pig when you were pregnant.

Total disconnect with reality...

Edited by scottiecl, 08 May 2006 - 03:33 PM.


#46 forumbulge

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Posted 14 May 2006 - 10:12 PM

scottiecl - great story.
The lengths marketers go to huh? :)

#47 swainzy

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Posted 17 May 2006 - 12:24 PM

I just ran across this study while researching another matter. It is from the European Interactive Advertising Association 2006 study.

EIAA

It starts out:
"The first ever pan-European insight into women's attitudes and interaction with the internet has revealed that within the next year they will be online more than men if current growth trends continue. The EIAA Digital Women Report forms part of the EIAA Mediascope Europe Study and is the most comprenehisve research available, looking into how European women allocate their time across media and how consumers use the internet."

"The fastest growing websites visited by women are travel, auction, shopping and banking/finance sites."

It goes onto discuss many other topics - Attitudes to the Internet, Impact of Broadband, Impact of Advertisers, etc.

Donna



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