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Do You Have A Commercialization Index?


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#1 iamlost

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Posted 05 June 2008 - 12:54 PM

From the ubiquitous Mr. Slawski:

Comparing How Commercial Different Search Categories are for Search Advertising

A Yahoo patent application describes some information ... that Yahoo refers to as a Search Category Commercialization Index (SCCI).
...
The Yahoo patent application introduces the idea of a search category commercialization index, which could be calculated by looking at two or more metrics from a group that would consist of:

1. Number of searches within the category;
2. Number of searches within the category that result in results pages having sponsored search results;
3. Number of total advertisers in the category;
4. Average number of sponsored search listings for results pages in the category
5. Click-through rate for advertisements in the category;
6. Share of sponsored search results that are clicked versus other items that are clicked on results pages in the category;
7. Average price per click on a sponsored search result advertisement; and,
8. Lifetime value of users who perform searches within the category.

An interesting side note (the ad compass rose is merely amusing :)) is the note that infrequent, i.e. likely web ignorant, people query differently (possibly as if asking another person rather than a database?) resulting in fewer returns and increased ad relevance.

...it was unexpectedly discovered that light users have the best likelihood of clicking on advertising, while searching for certain categories on the search results page. It was also unexpectedly discovered that a significant proportion of light user activity has no coverage.

There is a lot of meat and even more leftover hash potential for the thoughtful and imaginative competitive webmaster in Bill's article (and the patent filing itself).

My very first thought when reading those 8-points (quoted above) was: that is basic traffic data analysis. Second was: that is patentable? But then those are common thoughts about the US Patent Office.

My slings and arrows directed towards the USPO aside I see two very useful discussion directions:
1. When you collect/analyse site/niche traffic data are you doing so via a prescribed comparative methodology such as Yahoo's Commercialization Index? What other process(es) could reveal content relative strengths and weaknesses?

2. How best can a site pick up those ad-happy-clickers who query SEs 'differently'? Where, outside of SE internal data, are relevant profitable long tail 'real language' queries resident?

#2 EGOL

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Posted 05 June 2008 - 02:31 PM

Thanks for starting the thread on this topic. It's very interesting.

Would providing advertisers with more information about how people search and interact with ads, and which categories of searches might provide better advertising opportunities inspire more advertising?


I would really like to see this. If search engines share some information on how people behave on their sites I think that webmasters and advertisers would be better able to "hit the mark".

#3 iamlost

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Posted 05 June 2008 - 03:05 PM

If search engines share some information on how people behave on their sites I think that webmasters and advertisers would be better able to "hit the mark".

Not sure what you mean by 'on their sites'.
If you mean on the SE query results pages, i.e. search ads, that might benefit ppc but am not sure I see how it would benefit me with my niche site as the content type and the visitor context are quite different.

If you mean how people behave on my sites, particularly regarding ad/af interaction, that I know in far greater detail than any SE.

Please elaborate.

#4 bragadocchio

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Posted 06 June 2008 - 09:23 AM

My very first thought when reading those 8-points (quoted above) was: that is basic traffic data analysis. Second was: that is patentable? But then those are common thoughts about the US Patent Office.



I liked this patent filing primarily because it provided some insights into the metrics and approaches that a search engine might use to inspire people to use their advertising services.

1. When you collect/analyse site/niche traffic data are you doing so via a prescribed comparative methodology such as Yahoo's Commercialization Index? What other process(es) could reveal content relative strengths and weaknesses?


Some very good questions, that people should definitely spend some time exploring.

One questions that nags at me is what I might be missing that I shouldn't be, and which I might not be able to learn from looking at stats from a specific site - which terms should I have on a page, what information and features, what explanations? A hint of those might be available from queries used on a site search, as well as the questions received by contact form, email, and phone.

Is a very large site like Yahoo or Google able to take better advantage of data that they receive than much smaller sites, because of the amount of traffic they receive, or the information that they get from advertisers or users?

2. How best can a site pick up those ad-happy-clickers who query SEs 'differently'? Where, outside of SE internal data, are relevant profitable long tail 'real language' queries resident?


How do people talk about the services or goods that you offer, or similar services or goods? Where do they talk about them online? Blogs? Forums? Industry news sites? Competitors' sites? Sites that offer complementary goods or services? How do you capture that information, track it, analyze it, test it?

#5 iamlost

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Posted 06 June 2008 - 11:19 AM

One questions that nags at me is what I might be missing that I shouldn't be, and which I might not be able to learn from looking at stats from a specific site - which terms should I have on a page, what information and features, what explanations? A hint of those might be available from queries used on a site search, as well as the questions received by contact form, email, and phone.

The data miner nightmare - what drop of juice am I not squeezing from what input am I missing...;)

You bring up oft overlooked sources - basic web log analysis is not the only source of site visitor interaction and useful information.

Thanks for answering my questions with even more questions. :)
All hail SocratesByTheSea :)

Actually, I already do much of what you suggest - nice scripts (GoogleAlerts is for Googlers) that query SEs and follow up new backlinks, parse, filter, and file for reference.

My (almost rhetorical) questions were more about those quarter of daily queries the SEs have never seen before, those queries so-long-the-tail-is-over-the-horizon and the SEs have few returns and no relevant contextual ads. That old AOL data release was very rich in this regard.

Not that one is after fruit hanging so high that one content page equals one ad click. Rather that certain highly local terms, phrases, and thought processes can be added or combined. As in placer mining where the prospector with the gold pan is followed by the rocker, the sluice, and the dredge; each finding wealth the other left behind.

Off Topic offtopic
I find myself to be ratehr sadly amusing - I have stopped adding content, except for important news and factual changes/updates. Yet I still worry and re-worry those well gnawed bones of traffic and conversion. It may be an unhealthy addiction but I prefer to consider my behaviour simply having fun (and frustration) playing a custom strategy game...a lot. :)

Welcome to Web Marketers Anonymous
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#6 bragadocchio

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Posted 06 June 2008 - 11:44 AM

Thanks for answering my questions with even more questions. :)
All hail SocratesByTheSea :)



You're welcome. :)

Alerts can be helpful. I like using RSS feeds for mentions of specific phrases in different blog search engines and from other sources, too.

Uncovering new terms, and new categories, like the "Mp3 Players" example in the patent application, that really developed some search traffic only after the release of the ipod may mean paying attention to the conversations that your audience may be having on the Web, and the efforts of others in a market, as well as trends that are developing.

Regardless of the specific tactics someone may use to uncover value in phrases, in categories, in what interests audiences, having a strategy of some kind helps, and amending that strategy as necessary can make a difference. Finding ways to listen to your audience, and their questions and conversations may be one approach. Finding ways to initiate conversations, and then to listen is another. Combining the two may provide even more value.

#7 wheeler

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Posted 13 June 2008 - 07:35 AM

Wow!

What a great thread, thanks for starting. It was really helpful to me..:(



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