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Google Adwords Question: Why Are The Click Costs So Different For Same Phrase


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#1 earlpearl

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Posted 21 January 2011 - 05:29 PM

I've been running a test google adwords campaign for the first time and finding some incredibly diverse and different results.

The campaigns are for a local B&M in an urban market. I'm using a lot of the same phrases in both campaigns. One ad has a landing page on the site for the B&M. One ad has a different url that has a landing page which describes the business, has a link to the business, and the phone number address of the business.

The text of the ads is dramatically similar. I'm running different combinations of exact match and the other two types of matches for google adwords, trying to pick up specific phrases and relevant alternatives in a regional market place around the businesses.

The short term idea about the ad campaign was to monopolize 2 of the top 3 ppc positions besides having dominance in the organic and organic/local maps visibility. The radii around the campaigns is remarkably similar though not exact.

Here is the thing that sticks out.

For certain exact match phrases, wherein the two campaigns are bidding just about the same price; on one campaign we are paying about $8-12/click. For the other campaign we are paying about $4-6/click.

What gives? That is so widely divergent it is hard to comprehend.

We are getting some widely divergent data from the two campaigns/ even with remarkably similar parameters.

Any insights would be appreciated.

For an exact

#2 EGOL

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Posted 21 January 2011 - 07:37 PM

The short term idea about the ad campaign was to monopolize 2 of the top 3 ppc positions besides having dominance in the organic and organic/local maps visibility.

YES! :)

(actually, you should only be able to have one PPC position)


For certain exact match phrases, wherein the two campaigns are bidding just about the same price; on one campaign we are paying about $8-12/click. For the other campaign we are paying about $4-6/click.

Different markets, different competitors, potentially different keywords, potentially different quality scores, competitors changing their bidding, competitors blowing through budget, competitors dayparting, different everything.

The better you understand adwords the more variability you expect and the less you know that you will really understand.

The next time BGTheory has a seminar in Philadelphia you should think about going....
http://www.bgtheory....words-seminars/

I've done the seminar twice and read his book twice. Still learning... but making a lot more money.

Edited by EGOL, 21 January 2011 - 09:34 PM.


#3 earlpearl

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Posted 22 January 2011 - 03:20 PM

EGOL:

When you articulate about dominating a market, my response is the same emotional response: YES :emo6: :emo6:

I am going to look hard at ppc lessons a la the one you suggested.

As to the situation.

One other funny (not so funny in our opinion) perspective. Having run these campaigns, my colleagues and I have tried various keyword phrases while in different locations within the test region.

The default locations are different to start--then we adjust new locations to different towns within the region where the ads should be showing.

The ads show: but 95 times out of 100 we see different results of who is 1st, 2nd, 3rd, 4th, etc. in google adwords. There is no accounting for this campaign and what we are seeing.

We've bid these ads up. We have similarly high quality ratings for the ads. The content of the ads and the titles are remarkably similar.

The results don't just jive--not even close.

So much for the technical part of the strategy. We have other aspects of what we are trying to do.


Before even running this I checked in a couple of places to see if it was okay to run 2 ads for the same ultimate service and business--though the ads have landing pages on totally different urls. Didn't see any restrictions.

I was going to run 3 ads. Not so sure now in that google delivers the ads in a manner that is difficult to make sense of.

Oh well.

Think I'll take your suggestion and study up more on Big G PPC and look at your recommendation.

#4 EGOL

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Posted 22 January 2011 - 03:36 PM

PPC can be very challenging. I've been using it for a long time.

You don't know what other people are bidding and you don't know their quality score. And, if you don't understand quality scores really really well then you are throwing away a lot of money.

The day that I really started to understand quality scores was the day that I started to make progress.

#5 earlpearl

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Posted 23 January 2011 - 04:11 PM

tx.

I'll go back into quality score. I'm definitely not a wizard there. I have taken existing campaigns and redone them several times/ tightening the groupings/ titles/ phrases to create a tighter grouping of titles/phrases/connecting to search phrases. Did see a bump in quality scores when I went through that process.

#6 EGOL

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Posted 23 January 2011 - 06:51 PM

When you see a bump in the quality score you save major money. MAJOR MONEY.

The important thing is to understand them well enough to exert some control over them.

Your goal is to take control of your quality score.

Relevance of the ad, relevance of the landing page, CTR of the ad, and conversion rate of the landing page are some of the most important factors in the quality score.

Bid aggressively... it might cost more but might lower increase your QS enough to offset cost.

Write ads that elicit clicks. A high CTR will increase your quality score.

Write several ads for the same ad group. Give google control to give the highest CTR ads the most impressions... then you cut the ones that don't have a good combination of CTR and conversion rate.

Use negative keywords to avoid impressions on broad term matches that are useless (that should boost CTR - but lower impressions)

Cut keywords that are getting a lot of impressions or a lot of clicks but have very bad conversion rates.

The items I mentioned above allow you to take control of the quality score.

Your goal is to take control of your quality score.

Edited by EGOL, 24 January 2011 - 06:27 AM.


#7 earlpearl

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Posted 24 January 2011 - 12:02 AM

tx EGOL:

I have not spent much time on quality score at all. Only enough to move from very poor to fair....and then was satisfied.

Looks like I have a lot of studying and experimentation to do.

Very very helpful.


:applause:



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