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How Often Do You Produce New Content?


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#1 Dr.Marie

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Posted 05 August 2011 - 06:15 AM

I have several sources of content on my site, but I'd love to discuss the differences between two areas:

1. Lasting kick-donkey (that's your word EGOL :) ) content: This is the stuff that is built to attract links and to be the best of its kind on the web. It takes many hours to create, but will be relevant forever.

2. Fresh new stories: I regularly scour the news and then write a relevant story that explains a current issue. This might take 30-60 minutes to create.

What I'm finding is that the Adsense revenue on my news stories is WAAAAAY higher than on my lasting content. I guess the freshness of it attracts new ads that haven't been "smart priced" yet.

I'm not likely to change much now - I'll probably keep creating both types of content, but I thought it would be an interesting topic to discuss.

What kind of content do you produce the most?

Edited by Dr.Marie, 05 August 2011 - 07:09 AM.


#2 EGOL

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Posted 05 August 2011 - 07:51 AM

I have four types of content. btw... we don't kick donkeys here :)

1) Article content. These are (in my opinion) very high quality research articles that are among the best on the web in their niche. Most are several thousand words in length and illustrated with six to twelve photos, data, graphs and cartoons. They take at least a week of work from me. A staff member is always helping me with data collection, photography or graphics production. These articles often rank #1 in google for quite difficult terms and pull a lot of traffic. I produce, about one of these per month. Some of these make really nice money. Some produce a small but steady flow of income that could last until after I am playing a harp or shoveling coal in the afterlife.


2) Reference content. These include: graphics, glossary, short definition-type articles, photos with detailed captions. We produce two or three of these each month. They each require a few hours of work. They account for most of the traffic on our site but income from these is quite low per pageview because people get their information and leave. However, very high traffic x low income can be worthwhile.


3) Newsy blog. Every weekday and sometimes on the weekend we post between eight and ten newsy items that are one to three sentences in length. These point to content on other websites that we believe people in our industry and academic niches will be interested in. These require a lot of time and don't produce profitable income, however, we have a steadily growing number of subscribers and if that continues for another year or two this activity could cross the profitability line. I run this blog because I really enjoy it, it earns a lot of links and flashes back and forth between PR6 and PR7. Lots of people arrive at this blog every day by typing our domain name into google search and clicking into the blog. I think that the domain queries are worth the work.

4) Republished content. We republish one or two pages of content given to us by government agencies or public institutions each week. They want their content displayed on our site because we have a lot more visitors looking for that topic than they do. They might have one article on the topic but we have dozens and our visitors often look at many articles in a single visit. I republish their content because it is very high quality, it enriches our site and the cost of content production is zero. Income on this content is low because the quality is so high that very little attention is paid to the ads. Also, the topics generally do not match commercial products so contextual ads are not well targeted.

Edited by EGOL, 05 August 2011 - 08:08 AM.


#3 Dr.Marie

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Posted 05 August 2011 - 08:19 AM

Oh...too funny...I just noticed that in my first post..."Kick a.s.s." got changed to kick-donkey!

#4 bwelford

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Posted 05 August 2011 - 09:39 AM

Pretty well all my content is original but I always let the current events trigger what I'm writing about. That's for a variety of reasons but principally it means that many may be searching for what I have to say. I look at how searchers may be searching for that current information and then try to make sure that I will appear on their radar screens. It's usually not difficult to do so since news sources seem notoriously bad at being search-engine visible.

In this approach I usually give a few links out to authoritative sources of related topics. My assumption is that being a hub site is something Google finds favorable and accordingly ranks these better in its algorithms.

#5 DonnaFontenot

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Posted 05 August 2011 - 09:43 AM

And really, kick-donkey is even more effective because it causes the reader to stop, pause, think, giggle. :)

And that's the way content should work, of whatever sort. It should cause a reaction. I think if it does that, it may not matter what type of content it is. I need to focus on that aspect more than I do sometimes.

In general, though, over the years I've tended to move more towards creating evergreen content as much as possible. It tends to work better for me, but I think that could be very niche-specific. That also means that I write less because I have less topics to write about and it takes much longer to write each one, but that suits me better as well, mainly just for personality reasons and time issues.

Ideally, a site should probably have a nice mix of all types, so that it covers the broadest spectrum of need, but of course, ideals are often not met. :)

#6 iamlost

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Posted 05 August 2011 - 11:34 AM

I use a similar content model as EGOL and highly recommend it.

However, I never bothered adding a blog, the closest imitation being writing a 'breaking news' style short article then over time adding, to that same page, background and follow-ups as appropriate - the goal being every page of content to be as evergreen (and as updated) as possible.

When starting out I do recommend adding new content at least daily. This serves three purposes:
* builds site faster.
* encourages visitor returns; especially important with low start out visitor numbers.
* leverage SE hunger for new content.
If you look at EGOL's content types the mixture, particularly the republishing, makes this easier than it might initially appear.

Once a site is reasonably established dropping frequency to semi-weekly or weekly can be considered...taking into account the niche and it's visitor expectations and competitors' behaviour.

The nice thing about spending the time and effort to create evergreen content is that when you finally really want to slack off (such as I did a few years back) the body of work still keeps producing.

One critical and oft overlooked/missed part of the content process is marketing.
Creation -> Publication -> Marketing.
Especially if one wants to go beyond default SE traffic generation marketing of one's content is necessary.

#7 Michael_Martinez

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Posted 05 August 2011 - 01:21 PM

I believe that if you are trying to build visibility for a site you need to publish new content on it every day for a long time. Otherwise, it's just a piece of flotsam bouncing around in a Web filled with content.

The quality of individual articles is not as important as the consistency of the quality you deliver, in my view. You'll occasionally publish some doggerel and once in a while you'll publish something brilliant but if you can consistently deliver something people WANT to read then you'll be okay.

Some people obsess over making every article a piece of link bait. I have never seen anyone do that consistently. Their link bait usually ends up being formulaic cookie-cutter content that puts numbers in the titles, uses bullet lists and infographics for content, and generally doesn't share anything unique or interesting.

#8 tam

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Posted 05 August 2011 - 02:16 PM

I was wondering what kick-donkey content was lol

Depends on the site obviously, but my bunny one there is two main types:

1. Articles.. these are researched, take a bit longer, usually contain relevant pics/graphics and link in with other content. They are also more tied in with search phrases and adsense

2. Blog Posts... these are fun ... sometimes they are about writing the articles or making the video (eg outtakes) or they are on what I think rather than a more (I don't know the word.. sort of less official) and they have current news etc. I don't actually have ads on these at the moment. They generally take much less time to write.

#9 Dr.Marie

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Posted 05 August 2011 - 02:26 PM

Some people obsess over making every article a piece of link bait. I have never seen anyone do that consistently. Their link bait usually ends up being formulaic cookie-cutter content that puts numbers in the titles, uses bullet lists and infographics for content, and generally doesn't share anything unique or interesting.


Thank you for posting this! I can feel myself falling into this trap. There are a number of topics where I think I could write a decent article. But, what's stopping me is that I feel that I can't publish anything unless it is super amazing content that is going to be shared by EVERYONE.

I think it's good to publish some stuff that is just "ok" to test the waters and then occasionally come out with a bombshell of a page.

One critical and oft overlooked/missed part of the content process is marketing.
Creation -> Publication -> Marketing.
Especially if one wants to go beyond default SE traffic generation marketing of one's content is necessary.


This may warrant a new thread...but what kind of things do you do for marketing?

Edited by Dr.Marie, 05 August 2011 - 02:27 PM.


#10 EGOL

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Posted 05 August 2011 - 02:30 PM

I am also interested in marketing. I don't do much right now. I just rely on visitors and search engines to do this for me.

Maybe the only other thing that I do is put up a blog post about each new article and that blog post automatically posts to my twitter and facebook accounts.

Occasionally I might submit something to reddit, stumble, slashdot or digg... but visitors often do that without any work from me.... and suddenly I see traffic from one of those sources.

Edited by EGOL, 05 August 2011 - 02:31 PM.


#11 RisaBB

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Posted 05 August 2011 - 03:01 PM

Wow! Awesome topic, Dr. Marie! I'd rather add new products to my site because it's more gratifying, after taking all the photos, and writing the descriptions. Writing an actual article or blog post is more work. I probably only get a major article online a few times a year and a new blog post every month, but I'll have to make a concerted effort to do this more, like at least something every day....along with getting more involved with facebook, twitter, get videos of my products on youtube.... get my photos on flickr.....

But articles and any kind of writing for my own site really does seem more concrete to me.

Edited by RisaBB, 05 August 2011 - 05:53 PM.


#12 tam

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Posted 05 August 2011 - 05:18 PM

What I'm finding is that the Adsense revenue on my news stories is WAAAAAY higher than on my lasting content. I guess the freshness of it attracts new ads that haven't been "smart priced" yet.


Is that short or long term? i.e. say over a 6 months or even years, does the lasting get more revenue than news that gets a lot of hits short term but then goes dead?

#13 Michael_Martinez

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Posted 05 August 2011 - 08:08 PM

I think you definitely have to leverage whatever resources you have to help create visibility for your Website. Marketing is critical to building your visibility AND credibility.

Just covering basic stuff like sharing links on social media sites through RSS feeds should standard operational procedure. Of course you also want to reach out to friends and associates and ask them to help you promote your high-value content.

And there is nothing wrong with placing a few targeted ads or maybe getting in touch with the media if you have something appropriate.

Just using free press release services, social calendars, and a small number of blogs I've been able (on occasion) to build interest and visibility in upcoming events. The same principle works just fine for building traffic to a new Website (or a reviving Website) when you're publishing a substantial body of work there.

#14 iamlost

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Posted 06 August 2011 - 01:53 PM

Dr.Marie: please find the beginning of an answer to your question This may warrant a new thread...but what kind of things do you do for marketing? at Marketing Your Content.

#15 A.N.Onym

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Posted 07 August 2011 - 10:07 AM

Gotta agree that promoting the best of the web content is what produces the most results (at least in my experience). Especially, if the content was targeted at the social websites. Just publishing best of the web content without promoting is just tossing money/time/efforts at the wind, because social websites and bloggers link much, much more often, compared to search traffic. At least a submission to Sumbleupon and placing a Delicious/topical voting button above the fold would help marketing the article somewhat.

EGOL, apart from social sites, there are lots of niche bloggers that you might have already talked with. Have you tried discussing your upcoming best of the web content with them with the goals to improve it and/or promote it?

Edited by A.N.Onym, 07 August 2011 - 10:24 AM.


#16 EGOL

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Posted 07 August 2011 - 10:25 AM

Have you tried discussing your upcoming best of the web content with them with the goals to improve it and/or promote it?

I have never discussed it with them in advance or even afterwards. However, some of those bloggers subscribe to my blog feed and link to content that they like. For the past several years I have not done any linkbuilding... none... just allowing my visitors to do that for me.

Edited by EGOL, 07 August 2011 - 10:26 AM.


#17 A.N.Onym

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Posted 07 August 2011 - 11:26 AM

It seems that there's lots of potential to your link building, if you actively seek links to the best of the web content, then ;) Without pushing the bloggers a lot, of course )

#18 EGOL

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Posted 07 August 2011 - 11:34 AM

It seems that there's lots of potential to your link building, if you actively seek links to the best of the web content

I agree... I could promote it... or hire someone to promote it...

For now I'll hold that as "strength in reserve" if I ever need it.



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