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For (some Of) The People


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#1 iamlost

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Posted 07 August 2011 - 12:44 PM

What follows is not new but I believe that it deserves repetition, at least until it becomes redundant. Every point is a variation on a single theme; can you identify what that is?

1. build your business model and website around a framework of people and their needs/wants/desires not technologies and their requirements.

2. your website content must first be useful to your market audience before you need worry about whether the site itself is usable.

3. knowing your market segments is critical, knowing your competitors is useful.

Plus a proposition:
that being the best possible (given resources available) in the mind of your market audience is a necessity, being a trend setter is a luxury. Or, put another way, that given the choice of being new or being improved, improvement is generally of greater benefit over time.

#2 jonbey

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Posted 07 August 2011 - 01:25 PM

What about "new and improved"?

#3 iamlost

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Posted 07 August 2011 - 04:42 PM

Can you say oxymoron?

#4 DCrx

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Posted 07 August 2011 - 07:15 PM

Every point is a variation on a single theme; can you identify what that is?


I'll take "what clients won't do" for $1000 Alex.

#5 A.N.Onym

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Posted 07 August 2011 - 10:31 PM

Nice one, DCrx ;)

I'd say "customer focus" and I gotta agree, it's been said so many times, but it hardly can hurt to make it redudant and worldwide acceptable (then we'd be in heaven, so I suppose it won't happen).

iamlost, you say there is "new" and "improved" and that "improved" is better. Oook. But what if there is something so radically *improved* that it also has become *new*? I hate to give this example, but it's an iPhone 1. or Vibram Fivefingers, if you see what I mean.

Edited by A.N.Onym, 07 August 2011 - 10:32 PM.


#6 iamlost

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Posted 07 August 2011 - 11:14 PM

Ah DCrx, ye of little faith... and sore understanding.

To be nobody-but-yourself-in a world which is doing its best, night and day, to make you everybody else - means to fight the hardest battle which any human being can fight; and never stop fighting.
---e e cummings, Statements on Poetry


Advance, the forlorn hope...


A.N.Onym: yes, there can be improvement such that it becomes a difference in kind rather than in degree. However, (without commenting on the merits of your examples) it remains 'improved' not new. At one time the internal combustion engine was 'new'. That carriages later went from horse drawn to engine driven was an improvement of the carriage, a difference in kind, but not something new. Similarly, the automobile of today is but a difference in degree to that of a hundred years ago.

Regardless, however valuable it may be to be a creator, it is more often those that follow that reap the greatest benefits. There is great value in invention but generally the greater benefits accrue to those that improve an original concept, which is why I said that being a trend setter is a luxury. Nothing wrong with such luxury but it is rare and tends to vanish under the onslaught of improvements - sadly, usually competitors.

#7 bwelford

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Posted 08 August 2011 - 09:37 AM

Clearly meeting clients' needs is the name of the game.

However sometimes a new product meets a need that most clients never thought they had. New technology allows completely different functionalities. Just think 'text messaging'. ;)

#8 A.N.Onym

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Posted 08 August 2011 - 10:16 AM

In that respect, you are right, iamlost. Hopefully, the trendsetters do have the open mind to continue improving their new products.



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