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Does Buying Facebook Likes Really Work?


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#1 Sumiakali03

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Posted 05 March 2013 - 01:56 AM

Hi, recently i have found that lot of companies are opting to buy Facebook likes. Is this a good strategy to improve Facebook likes? I have seen some of them are providing the number of likes, they are promising in their packages but would it matter for the business?


Edited by iamlost, 05 March 2013 - 05:58 AM.
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#2 jonbey

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Posted 05 March 2013 - 02:03 AM

No.



#3 Ken Fisher

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Posted 05 March 2013 - 05:27 AM

I never understood where the value is in this tactic. Is it like buying email addresses? Who are the likes? Fake FB accounts?

 

Is it one of those urban legends for the those that don't have a clue?

 

Of course I don't do Facebook much except to follow sites I'm interested in like this one.



#4 jonbey

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Posted 05 March 2013 - 06:39 AM

Exactly. I suspect that this question is really spam. But in case anyone really wants to know, then it is utterly pointless.

 

OK. if a marketing form was very influential and had hundreds of thousands of real fans themselves, they could suggest that those fans Like your page / site. But even then, it will be pretty poor engagement.

 

I bought Likes for a test site a while back, out of curiosity for the service. I paid a Fiverr and very soon had 700 "fans". All obvious fake accounts. No interaction (as expected). There really is no point. It will not help ranking in or out of Facebook.



#5 glyn

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Posted 05 March 2013 - 08:35 AM

I understand the value of this tactic but it's not going to wash with anyone that reads here and I'm in no mood for a sermon. :)



#6 EGOL

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Posted 05 March 2013 - 08:49 AM

I understand the value of this tactic but it's not going to wash with anyone that reads here and I'm in no mood for a sermon. :)

 

 

 

Booo!   We wanna hear!



#7 DonnaFontenot

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Posted 05 March 2013 - 09:31 AM

It can be moderately useful simply as a social proof concept. If a user sees a page with some Likes, the user is more likely to feel confident that the page has some value, and more likely to Like it as well. So, on a very LIMITED basis, for a new site or a new FB page, it can be useful for a ONE-TIME-ONLY jumpstart. I wouldn't recommend a huge number of these though. Maybe 50 or so as a jumpstart, and then do the work to get real likes.



#8 iamlost

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Posted 05 March 2013 - 09:41 AM

Naughty Donna.

glyn we already know is a thoroughly grey though not at all dull and boring webdev...



#9 cre8pc

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Posted 05 March 2013 - 11:45 AM

While some folks buy links and likes, I'm perfectly happy to buy popcorn and watch the "how to spam and pretend its marketing" show.  :morningcoffee:



#10 jonbey

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Posted 05 March 2013 - 11:49 AM

I recall an early conversation on Google+, somebody suggested that people could simply buy lots of followers, to which the reply from a Google employee was something like "go ahead and try it". 

 

There is nothing social about being followed by fake accounts, so why would anyone thing it would boost their social profile?



#11 joehall

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Posted 05 March 2013 - 12:34 PM

I can talk from experience: Other than the added social proof, its a giant waste of money. Only did it once for an affiliate site that I private owned. I thought, if it works well then I will use it for clients. It didn't.



#12 jonbey

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Posted 05 March 2013 - 03:20 PM

That is pretty much what I did. An already small site got slapped by Panda so I decided to see if adding more "social signals" would make a difference. A couple of people made a fiverr from me, very little money or time wasted on the experiment!

 

What was suprising was that Facebook said it was going to do something about all the fake accounts and the like, yet none of my fake followers vanished. 



#13 earlpearl

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Posted 05 March 2013 - 06:23 PM

I hate FB stats.   For a recent period for one of our sites we had abt 3600 likes.   We had a "reach of abt 5400" and about 185 were talking abt us.

 

But in that time period there were all of 54 actual unique visits to the FB page.  Of those 50 some uniques to the page several were from our staff and every day some competitors look at it.  And that 54 was a recent high.

 

That 3600 likes, 5400 reach and 185 talking abt us are a bunch of crock.



#14 jonbey

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Posted 06 March 2013 - 05:38 AM

Yep. I find social media extremely tough. You need a lot of sharing and liking to get anywhere.



#15 glyn

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Posted 06 March 2013 - 11:01 AM

Here's a funny thing (first that a spam post started with a piece of software managed to start a big discussion - yay there is value in it then!) I just ran a report for a client based on activity that I did for them during the month of Feb. I did usual linkbuilding stuff, but I did 90% social media. What I have seen is that revenue goals are attributable to non-paid advertising at a rate of between 50% and 77%. I really did not think that would be the case, but it is. That's cool, because SEO can be pretty boring sometimes, especially when G's constantly fluxing out anything of commercial value.



#16 earlpearl

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Posted 06 March 2013 - 11:14 AM

Here's a funny thing (first that a spam post started with a piece of software managed to start a big discussion - yay there is value in it then!) I just ran a report for a client based on activity that I did for them during the month of Feb. I did usual linkbuilding stuff, but I did 90% social media. What I have seen is that revenue goals are attributable to non-paid advertising at a rate of between 50% and 77%. I really did not think that would be the case, but it is. That's cool, because SEO can be pretty boring sometimes, especially when G's constantly fluxing out anything of commercial value.

1.  spam does work at times, doesn't it.  ;)

2.  I suspect social media works differently depending on the type of website, service, business, etc.  It works differently for different entitities.

3.  It stinks for our local business services.   But if I had a local restaurant or especially a bar...I'd be pushing it a lot.   For bigger, more expensive products or services...we certainly haven't made it work to date.

 

I still hate their friggin statistics.   



#17 tommr

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Posted 06 March 2013 - 11:46 AM

I understand Donna's point but...

Maybe spend some time and create something people like and they will like it.  For free.

And after a while and given the chance they don't like it, maybe that is a sign that it needs to be better.

 

Buying likes is, well, like surrounding your self with yes men.



#18 iamlost

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Posted 06 March 2013 - 12:43 PM

Social Media platforms can not actually track how what happens there affects anything not there. And don't actually want behaviours/metrics that are not proprietary - or at least appear that way.
Plus people generally:
* misrepresent personal data.
* provide perceived desired answer.
* ignore actions that take time or thought.

Put all that together and we get soft, fuzzy metrics that are easily gamed.

It is much better to look for a SM platform where actual (and so also prospective) customers congregate where:
* one can see existing evidence of discussion of and recommendations within one's niche, and/or
* one can see a practical method of marketing (note: customer service is marketing) to that group in that milieu that will be accepted by the community, and
* where you can see how to track the metrics that you consider important.

Is it easy? No.
Can it be done? Maybe. It can be done depending on metrics choice: many may well be impractical.

Those who use SM their own way, not simply following the herd, tend to keep quiet about specifics. Perhaps knowing that something, however undefined :) is possible will encourage taking a fresh look. Or not.

I'm fortunate in that many of the merchants I'm affiliated with have a range of product/service price points allowing a range of conversions, i.e. small, add-on, upgrade. Sort of small steps as well as large ones; to have only one or more large ones would certainly be a challenge. Are there associated 'tastes' that can be offered to bring people in and get them comfortable and thinking of you when that big purchase becomes necessary?

Note: if you recognise happy clients already within SM platforms it can worthwhile reaching out and bringing them onboard as 'influencers'. That offline networking can leverage that online is often overlooked.
 



#19 cre8pc

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Posted 06 March 2013 - 01:27 PM

Sumiakali03, whoever they may be, may never return but isn't it interesting that  what may be a spam dunk and run post turned into a great thread?



#20 ptsmultimedia

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Posted 19 March 2013 - 03:01 PM

No, nothing fake is ever good. Social platforms like facebook and twitter are for being social. You can have 10,000 likes on your page but if no one is interacting then whats the point? A good facebook page will have a good ratio of "likes" over engagement "talking about this".

 

Another thing to keep in mind is as technology keeps advancing, companies like facebook are going to be able to tell if likes are fake or not, take twitter for example, they have already started to filter out fake followers on many profiles.

 

The only thing it may help is your "social proof" the more likes you have, the more popular you look. But if i come across a page with 5000 likes and only 1 person is talking about it, I am going to assume a lot of those are fake. -Not worth it in my opinion 


Edited by ptsmultimedia, 17 April 2013 - 02:22 PM.


#21 charlieiPad

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Posted 25 March 2013 - 08:28 PM

Be carefull with fake account on Facebook, do not buy the fake one.


Edited by charlieiPad, 25 March 2013 - 08:28 PM.


#22 jonbey

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Posted 01 April 2013 - 11:14 AM

Yeah. If I remember correctly the opening post was promoting their own Facebook Like service, and not suggesting that you advertise your page with Facebook advertising - this does work, as you mostly get real people, and you can target people too.



#23 Walter

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Posted 03 April 2013 - 07:52 PM

Like Donna, and from a strictly practical perspective, I think there is some value in purchasing likes to jump start a fb page, especially if you intend to do fb advertising.  I've noticed in some fb ads the number of likes your page has is diplayed, "0" or "1" is not what you want showing up in that case.  I wouldn't expect any direct interaction or conversions from those likes, but would expect to see a higher click through rate on my ads and a higher like rate and more engagement from legit visitors sooner. 

 

Plus I don't have to bother my friends and relatives about "liking" my page.

 

Walter



#24 ptsmultimedia

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Posted 17 April 2013 - 02:27 PM

Buying Facebook could be a good strategy so long as you are actively trying to pursue real fans who will give honest likes. I guess the big difference is you gotta separate buying likes and buying fake likes.
Advertising and promoted posts are essentially buying likes, but they are also targeted to specific criteria.

 

Advertising and promoted posts may essentially be "buying likes", however, when people actually "buy likes" they are a bunch of fake and inactive Facebook accounts. At least those people who are liking your page from an ad, are doing so because it is of value to them, or something you posted they liked and thought was worthy of their finger click. 



#25 cre8pc

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Posted 17 April 2013 - 05:04 PM

 At least those people who are liking your page from an ad, are doing so because it is of value to them, or something you posted they liked and thought was worthy of their finger click. 

 

Yup...Facebook promos of pages and posts are pretty cheap.  I was surprised.  I've used it to promote our Cre8asiteforums Facebook page.  The hope is that those "likes" will follow the discussions I post there and if they want to join in the discussion they would register here.  



#26 LampardFC82

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Posted 27 April 2013 - 04:35 AM

i don't think facebook likes is useful for getting valueable traffic.For those are in business for selling LIKES are just about making rubbish.Anyway,some of them might thinks facebook like can be one of the method of BlackHat seo.



#27 mihaistamate

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Posted 03 May 2013 - 07:51 PM

Some guys are still buying Facebook likes, but in my opinion it's almost useless. The only advantage is that you can hide the fact that your website doesn't really have a lot of likes and it's not that popular.



#28 alexdornado

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Posted 16 May 2013 - 12:46 AM

I say people visit your fan page and see your page likes and if your fb likes is high people impressed and follow your page otherwise they do not so i think do this and get fake likes on your page



#29 jonbey

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Posted 16 May 2013 - 03:54 AM

One possible positive effect - I read that Bing monitors Facebook interaction (not just likes) and uses this to some extent. No idea where or how. Think the chap I was listening to / reading (really cannot remember) said that speed at which people like, share and comment a new story is a factor. 

 

I suspect comments and shares are more important - these are not generally "services" which the "1000 FAcebook likes" deals offer. And you may not be getting the bought likes at the right time either.



#30 cre8pc

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Posted 16 May 2013 - 01:44 PM

The question should be, "Do Facebook "likes" convert to sales?   Fake or real, this is the ultimate goal and if likes don't mean people are visiting the actual web site and doing something worthwhile there, then those "like"s and the investment into faking them needs to be discussed.



#31 mihaistamate

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Posted 20 May 2013 - 08:27 PM

It's true, it does work. But buying Facebook likes is a complete waste of money because of the small exposure and little money to earn.



#32 Zach87

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Posted 21 May 2013 - 04:04 PM

I have found buying Facebooks likes to be very effective for my business page. I find that having more likes on my page leads to more people liking it. Though I would say be a bit careful where you buy the likes from. I have had some bad experiences with a few sites.


Edited by iamlost, 21 May 2013 - 04:48 PM.
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#33 earlpearl

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Posted 21 May 2013 - 06:13 PM

The question should be, "Do Facebook "likes" convert to sales?   Fake or real, this is the ultimate goal and if likes don't mean people are visiting the actual web site and doing something worthwhile there, then those "like"s and the investment into faking them needs to be discussed.

 

I like Kim's comment.  It probably works in some cases.  It hasn't worked for some relatively smallish sites representing some entirely different kinds of services that appeal to vastly different crowds.   The only things similar among them are that they are local sites and that they represent services of a type that are somewhat pricey relative to the prospective audiences and the processes are a bit longish and involved.

 

With that in mind...likes don't do us a lot of good.  What we need are people with "likes" but really intent.  Intent has virtually always come from the web in search...from word of mouth....and from some very specific related sites that focus on core needs why people choose these different services.   Intent of some level has to be there...otherwise all the likes in the world end up worthless without any sales whatsoever.



#34 mrgoodfox

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Posted 20 September 2013 - 08:54 AM

I'll jump into the conversation too. I spend a good couple hundred dollars a month on FB promotions. 

 

I do FB advertising for few purposes:

 

1) Getting visitors to our website. I advertise to very specific demographics in other countries (ex. people in ???? profession in Indonesia). The cost per like is very cheap and then I use it to promote our content that is specifically written for that profession. 

2) Promoting local events. We host local professional mixers every now and then and I've found FB to be a great place to promote those events.

3) Credibility: I spend a good amount of money in the first few months of building a FB page on promoting it and getting enough fans that will leave comments and make the page active. I also make sure to post at least one or two related posts a day on them. 

 

I have to admit I don't make any direct money from Facebook though. I look at as more of a brand building tool. It's also cheap enough that makes experimenting with it not as expensive.



#35 earlpearl

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Posted 21 November 2013 - 05:41 PM

We recently started an FB advertising campaign wherein we are getting likes and we are getting contacts and some sales.

 

The messages are of two types.  We have a promotion and we are tying it to some posts that we boost that reference the service and payoffs.

 

What is occurring?

 

We are adding likes.  Its a sizeable number for us...but it isn't the major thrust of the campaign.   We do want payoff.   We are getting contacts and some sales are slipping in there.

 

Its the revenue numbers that interest us the most.

 

A rough overview on this campaign versus adwords and search.

 

In search the website and the ads in adwords respond to specific "intent" from the searcher.   Its a local business.  By running adwords we have a darned good feel for most of the search phrases that are out in the market.   Between organic/local and adwords we do get a healthy amt of that traffic and it converts into leads and sales.   Intent is behind it.

 

On fb we are getting what for us are tons of impressions.   Really a ton in our perspective.  Unlike search in this campaign all the time we are hit in the campaign are the results of ads.

 

We are getting hits in FB, the websites are getting visits, we are getting contacted.   it seems to be working.   Additionally the FB business page is getting dm'd with direct requests.   

 

We are getting leads.   The campaign is pretty new.   We'll be reviewing it to see how effective in sales we are doing.  The entire thing is running with discount/buy now messages.

 

Overall though, because intent is missing, because this is not an organic search environment....it won't produce the ROI that search provides.   but frankly we have a very healthy roi on adwords.   We don't expect it to match that.

 

But we are spending...it is buying likes...we are getting an increase in likes and we are getting revenues.    I guess you could say we are buying likes.



#36 mrgoodfox

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Posted 22 November 2013 - 01:41 PM

We recently started an FB advertising campaign wherein we are getting likes and we are getting contacts and some sales.

 

The messages are of two types.  We have a promotion and we are tying it to some posts that we boost that reference the service and payoffs.

 

What is occurring?

 

We are adding likes.  Its a sizeable number for us...but it isn't the major thrust of the campaign.   We do want payoff.   We are getting contacts and some sales are slipping in there.

 

Its the revenue numbers that interest us the most.

 

A rough overview on this campaign versus adwords and search.

 

In search the website and the ads in adwords respond to specific "intent" from the searcher.   Its a local business.  By running adwords we have a darned good feel for most of the search phrases that are out in the market.   Between organic/local and adwords we do get a healthy amt of that traffic and it converts into leads and sales.   Intent is behind it.

 

On fb we are getting what for us are tons of impressions.   Really a ton in our perspective.  Unlike search in this campaign all the time we are hit in the campaign are the results of ads.

 

We are getting hits in FB, the websites are getting visits, we are getting contacted.   it seems to be working.   Additionally the FB business page is getting dm'd with direct requests.   

 

We are getting leads.   The campaign is pretty new.   We'll be reviewing it to see how effective in sales we are doing.  The entire thing is running with discount/buy now messages.

 

Overall though, because intent is missing, because this is not an organic search environment....it won't produce the ROI that search provides.   but frankly we have a very healthy roi on adwords.   We don't expect it to match that.

 

But we are spending...it is buying likes...we are getting an increase in likes and we are getting revenues.    I guess you could say we are buying likes.

 

Keep us posted. I'm also helping a friend (has a local art gallery store) promote his business on Facebook. Its working out pretty good because of the nature of his business, nature of Facebook, and the fact that we can point to a very specific demographics of people. 



#37 earlpearl

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Posted 22 November 2013 - 03:04 PM

@mr. goodfox:   I'll get back to you.   We are working it and tracking it now.   We are getting likes, contacts and some sales.   The demographic is different than what we've been getting in the past in that its dramatically coming in via mobile.    FB traffic traditionally has come in stronger on pcs.

 

Don't know how this will pay off.   I strongly doubt it will create an roi as strong as adwords.  OTOH;  its getting a heap load of looks.  

 

We'll see.



#38 mrgoodfox

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Posted 22 November 2013 - 03:12 PM

@mr. goodfox:   I'll get back to you.   We are working it and tracking it now.   We are getting likes, contacts and some sales.   The demographic is different than what we've been getting in the past in that its dramatically coming in via mobile.    FB traffic traditionally has come in stronger on pcs.

 

Don't know how this will pay off.   I strongly doubt it will create an roi as strong as adwords.  OTOH;  its getting a heap load of looks.  

 

We'll see.

 

Yes. A large portion of FB traffic is mobile for us too.

 

I use FB advertising for another one of my websites (legal related) and I primarily use it for brand awareness and getting traffic to the legal articles we publish. So I measure my conversion there by the number of hits the articles get and the number of comments each article get (directly left on our website). People also send us questions through the FB page which I use as a source of ideas for new articles to publish



#39 earlpearl

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Posted 22 November 2013 - 06:16 PM

yr to date before this campaign FB traffic to the site has been running about 8 to 1 pc to mobile.   With this campaign we are seeing 50-50  maybe even more mobile.

 

Now I understand between apple and google analytics there could have been a lot of mobile traffic that gets reported as direct.  So all that old data into mobile could be misrepresentative.

 

I understand if we upgrade analytics to universal analytics big old G will provide better reporting.   guess I'm going to be doing that.



#40 earlpearl

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Posted 25 November 2013 - 12:03 PM

Here is what we've seen so far with regard to FB "buying likes".   We started an FB advertising campaign about 1 week ago.   We ran two ads..one of which ties to a discount promo campaign we are working.   There are some holes in tracking...but we never can track everything.

 

Immediately we got a surge in traffic to the smb websites  (pc and different site for mobile).   Mobile traffic relatively exploded.  It seems pc traffic went up a bit.   Mobile traffic is more than twice the recent norm.

 

As soon as the mobile traffic exploded we added the promo discount message to the front of the mobile page.  It wasn't there day 1.  

 

Now we have gotten a relative explosion of form leads off the mobile site (compared to previous periods).   Our leads in general come from web forms and phone calls.   We have pushed away from the sales staff doing "too many" questions about origin of finding us from the form leads or phone calls.  They focus on trying to make sales. and less on finding out how people found us.   (that is an admittedly bigger hole in tracking).  We know it.   The staff does not ask if a person is calling us on a mobile and if they just saw FB or the site on search or anywhere else.

 

In the last 7 weeks with heavy promotional discounts we have increased our effort to sell and close fast.  (to take advantage of discounts).   

 

That has worked remarkably well.  We've had tremendous volume...far more than past Octobers and Novembers.  We've had huge volumes of sales and closes within first day to within 7 days of first contacting the smb.    That has never been our pattern.

 

I'm going to have to check into the mobile form leads and track to sale to see if we can "assign" a reasonable and estimated value to the payback off of mobile and presumably off of the FB campaign.  It looks like it will payoff but I haven't taken that time consuming effort yet.

 

Meanwhile over many years this smb has probably had a ppc payback of about a range of $5-10 earned for every $1 spent.  That has been a great payback and ROI.  

 

I doubt we'll see or calculate FB payback at that rate but we'll see.

 

meanwhile we are getting a surge of "likes" in FB.  I also suspect it will increase "name" and "branding" recognition in the market place.  I suspect that will help over time.

 

I'll see if we can at least show a reasonable and probable payback to the FB campaign after looking at more of this week's activity.

 

In our case though, its not just the "buying likes" its attaching the ad campaign to a clear promo discount.





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