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Clients Who Dont Want To Use Social Media


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#1 Jged

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Posted 01 January 2014 - 09:00 AM

I have quite a few middle aged clients with websites who are not prepared to embrace social media but want to be at the top of the search engines.

 

So I was wondering what if anything I could do for them? Obviously they need to be on Facebook and I am prepared to post the odd message for them but what other social media is out there that is known to work from an SEO point of view and of course I am able to maintain without their input.

 

Any help appreciated. 

 

 



#2 EGOL

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Posted 01 January 2014 - 10:32 AM


 

I have quite a few middle aged clients with websites who are not prepared to embrace social media but want to be at the top of the search engines.

 

 
:)  I am not engaging social media simply because I don't like being social and I don't think that it is a good investment of my time.

 

I can spend my time writing an article that will serve thousands of people per month, year after year after year on a platform that I own/control and that I can easily monetize, or I can spend my time kibitzing on social media.  (I do post a bit on forums but that is a recreational use of my time which I have no obligation to do or continue - although it might involve some kibitzing :) ).

 

Although I don't embrace social with my time my website gets a lot of traffic from Facebook, Stumble, Pintrest and especially the TIL part of Reddit.  My visitors take my content to social for me because they want to share it with others.   It works nicely.  Other people do the jobs that I don't want to do and I don't have to pay them.  That's how things are supposed to work IMO.   It is more genuine to let it happen that way rather than hiring a shill to do it for you.

 

So, if you have a client who does not want to embrace social or is an old fart like me... then the recipe for getting something out of social is a library of content that includes the types of content that people like to share.  The items from my site that get shared a lot are OMG! topics, relevant-to-the-news topics, and fascinating images.  For your client's site it could be humor, rants, how-to-fix-it or snarky stuff.

 

 

 

 


 

 


Obviously they need to be on Facebook and I am prepared to post the odd message for them...

 

I am not convinced that they "need" to be on FB... and I am going to be skeptical about anyone who claims that he can speak to the topics of my websites unless he shows me a resume that demonstrates that he will know what he is talking about.  My sites are not written about opinions, gossip or yadda yadda topics.

 

 

I have never spent much time looking for social media opportunities.  I produce what I am good at producing, then some conversation starts on social media and somebody points at my content and a flood of people arrive... sometimes by the hundreds of thousands.

 

 


...what other social media is out there that is known to work from an SEO point of view and of course I am able to maintain without their input.

 

 

The influences that social media has had upon my content creation include:  A) a appreciation of the enormous value of great images... B) a slight bias to OMG topics... C) a willingness to create evergreen content that provides basic information about topics that are frequently in the news (and often doing that very quickly when something big in the news occurs that is related to the content area of my website).

 

If I was you, I would look at the traffic coming into the client site already.  What is happening on social that brings people to the website.  Make more of that... or more of what seems to drive traffic from social to other sites in the client's niche.  Outdo the competitors so you get the traffic.


Edited by EGOL, 01 January 2014 - 10:36 AM.


#3 cre8pc

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Posted 02 January 2014 - 10:39 AM

I have the same issue with a local company whose site I maintain.  He is a local guy who does house additions and renovations and they have a FB page but rarely any content to put there.  Same with their blog.  I see opportunities for writing but they don't seem interested, but still want to rank.



#4 test-ok

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Posted 02 January 2014 - 06:04 PM

IMHO...Social media should be used for sites that are social in nature, a local guy that does house additions isn't social in any way shape or form so why try and make it social? unlike a coffee shop, restaurant, local bar. Id say a blog on their site is a different story and isn't social but rather additional content. But then I might be in the same crowd as EGOL...just too damn old.



#5 margoupson

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Posted 02 January 2014 - 09:37 PM

IMHO...Social media should be used for sites that are social in nature, a local guy that does house additions isn't social in any way shape or form so why try and make it social? unlike a coffee shop, restaurant, local bar. Id say a blog on their site is a different story and isn't social but rather additional content. But then I might be in the same crowd as EGOL...just too damn old.

Respectfully, I'm not so sure. If you're doing house additions (or anything else in the construction trade), you definitely should be on social media, Facebook at the very least. That's a very visual field. He could take pictures of his work and use FB an online portfolio (although, he probably has on one his site, too, I'd imagine). He could tag his customers in the completed project pictures, and the pictures would show up for the customer's friends. It'd also make it easier for current/past customers to share his business with their friends. There are a lot of great reasons for someone in the construction field to use social media. They wouldn't have to post every day, but even a couple photos a week could really help their business.

 

For what it's worth, though, my father-in-law works as an independent contractor and I haven't been able to talk him into any sort of web presence at all, and my brother-in-law is the same way about his flooring company. Construction is a field that relies very heavily on word-of-mouth marketing, and it's hard to convince people that a web page and/or social media presence will actually make it easier for current customers to share their positive experiences and for new potential customers to find them.

 

I have quite a few middle aged clients with websites who are not prepared to embrace social media but want to be at the top of the search engines.

 

So I was wondering what if anything I could do for them? Obviously they need to be on Facebook and I am prepared to post the odd message for them but what other social media is out there that is known to work from an SEO point of view and of course I am able to maintain without their input.

 

Any help appreciated. 

I agree with EGOL about the importance of producing excellent content that people will want to share, although setting up accounts to share that content initially might not be a bad idea. Do they have a blog? You could set it up so that all of their new blog posts are automatically shared on social media sites. Alternatively, you might try to very gently show them the benefits of even a small amount of social media. Find some case studies, statistics, or whatever is going to work best for them (without being pushy). Even if they ease into it slowly, they would likely still see some benefits, and that might be enough for them to start to embrace the idea of more widespread use. 


Edited by margoupson, 02 January 2014 - 09:38 PM.


#6 clandestino

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Posted 02 January 2014 - 10:30 PM

IMHO...Social media should be used for sites that are social in nature, a local guy that does house additions isn't social in any way shape or form so why try and make it social? unlike a coffee shop, restaurant, local bar. Id say a blog on their site is a different story and isn't social but rather additional content. But then I might be in the same crowd as EGOL...just too damn old.

 

Social media is definitely better for someone who can sell based on referrals.  Twitter is a great place to meet influencers that could send business to you.

 

You just take the same marketing model pre-social media and implement it on Social Media.

 

The problem is, most small businesses aren't very good at networking and can't write very well -- I don't have a strategy for that.



#7 EGOL

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Posted 02 January 2014 - 10:32 PM


 

You could set it up so that all of their new blog posts are automatically shared on social media sites.

I have a blog with a few dozen posts per month going automatically to twitter and facebook.

 

There are several thousand twitter followers and a about a thousand people have "liked" the FB site.  However, these generate questions, comments and activity that I am not monitoring and don't want to engage in.  I have made the choice to dedicate all of my time producing content that serves a very large number of people who visit my website rather than communicate one-on-one with people on social media.   Social media scales in some ways but does not scale at all in other ways.

 

Let's say that your brother-in-law who has the flooring company has a facebook account  and posts a few things there, then lots of people arrive, the explain how they have a problem getting their flooring installed straight - can you please advise?......  which product should we use on our new floor??? .....    will you be a sponsor for our high school yearbook?.....  Oh... you are working near our place this week, can we come to the house where you are working tomorrow, we want to see how to lay flooring and pick your brain??    Our church is having a work party to install flooring on Saturday.. can you come lend a hand??  Please Please??

 

He needs to know that this is likely to happen before anyone gets him into FB.  Maybe he does not want to start this.  These questions and requests will happen... and people will think that he is a curmudgeon if he does not respond.  

 

I am certain that Facebook can be a fantastic way for some people with flooring companies to promote their business and establish enormous good will.  This works when the person wants to make that happen and likes engaging that way.  So, I am not knocking FaceBook for these types of businesses.  Just saying that it is not how I want to engage.  

 

If I had a flooring biz, I would have a great website that showcases my work.    I would rather do the polished presentation on my website and take top positions for my queries in local search.  Just not looking to do the social. 


Edited by EGOL, 02 January 2014 - 10:35 PM.


#8 clandestino

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Posted 02 January 2014 - 10:47 PM

The problem usually stems from not being able to write a blog post.  If you can create quality content, it opens up all kinds of Marketing and PR possibilities.

 

Most small businesses would hurt their brand more than help it by posting what they think people need to read --> probably with bad grammar and broken English.

 

Making all of this work takes creativity and an understanding of communications --> that's way beyond the capabilites of the large majority of small businesses.

 

I've struggled to come up with a way to do it for them that is cost effective, they'll be willing to pay for, and that works.

 

My conclusion: There are much better ways to allocate my consulting resources.

 

That's the problem with g#####'s model.  They want publishers and most people are not very good at it.  Seeing content that small businesses create helps me easily agree with the statistics I see about people graduationg from High School without being able to read and write at grade level.


Edited by chuckfinley, 02 January 2014 - 10:48 PM.


#9 test-ok

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Posted 02 January 2014 - 10:57 PM

(being a social hostess I can understand your take.)  

 

If you're doing house additions (or anything else in the construction trade), you definitely should be on social media, Facebook at the very least.

But I have to respectfully disagree, and it might also be an age thing.

I would never go looking for a construction contractor on Facebook, never in a million years, however I'd expect to see some pictures of their work on their site along with all the essential information. And on the other hand facebook for me is a place to socialize with friends and stay in touch with family, not to find flooring, lighting, room additions and what have ya...again this is probably an age thing. Not only that if any of my FB friends or family starred posting flooring job, room additions..it wouldn't be long until they ended up on the no friends list. I've never seen a good reason for most types of business that are not social in nature to promote themselves on FB.

 

and apparently I'm not alone  :D

 

For what it's worth, though, my father-in-law works as an independent contractor and I haven't been able to talk him into any sort of web presence at all, and my brother-in-law is the same way about his flooring company.

 

added, you guys type fast

 


 

Let's say that your brother-in-law who has the flooring company has a facebook account  and posts a few things there,

That's exactly what I was going after...if my friends started posting that stuff...they would be gone..IMO that's nothing more than social spam...No?


Edited by test-ok, 03 January 2014 - 04:51 PM.


#10 margoupson

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Posted 02 January 2014 - 11:54 PM

Let's say that your brother-in-law who has the flooring company has a facebook account  and posts a few things there, then lots of people arrive, the explain how they have a problem getting their flooring installed straight - can you please advise?......  which product should we use on our new floor??? .....    will you be a sponsor for our high school yearbook?.....  Oh... you are working near our place this week, can we come to the house where you are working tomorrow, we want to see how to lay flooring and pick your brain??    Our church is having a work party to install flooring on Saturday.. can you come lend a hand??  Please Please??

 

Right now, he is not doing any of it, and has started submitting applications at local businesses. Not marketing at all wasn't working out for him, as it turns out. 

 

I definitely see where you are coming from, and I'll admit that I didn't consider that side of things. That could turn into a difficult situation, and one that he'd have to be prepared for. There is a fine line between being helpful and being a push over, and companies need to have at least a vague idea of where they stand on all of this before these messages start arriving. He could have done some consulting between flooring jobs. It might have helped him out a bit, in the long run.  :D

 

Facebook isn't going to be perfect for every business, and, EGOL, you're obviously doing a great job of things without relying too heavily on it. But if a business does not already have a significant social media following, or if they are still trying to build their website traffic, it's probably going to help more than it will hurt the company (unless they completely mess it up, which is a possibility, too). 

 

I know of a few construction companies that use Facebook and they get good results. They show their recent projects and they share pictures of different project ideas. People see these posts, and then they want a new kitchen, bath, addition, or whatever else. They might not contact the company right away, but the idea has been planted, and they start considering changes they'd like to see in their own homes. Window shopping can be a powerful thing. Are all of these people going to buy? No. But a few might.

 

I wouldn't go looking for a construction contractor on Facebook, either, but I might 'like' a local company, especially if I was a home owner or looking to buy a home in the near future. Ideally, they'd have a website too, but a Facebook business page might gain them more exposure than just a website alone.  And with the number of local contractors that don't have a website, or an email address, or any other online presence (true for a shocking number of small businesses in my area), a Facebook page could be a step in the right direction. 

I think that there are very few businesses that don't belong on Facebook at all, and a whole lot of businesses that should be there, but...umm..could maybe use some help on using it properly. I once came across a pest control company that had a bad habit of posting pictures of their work. If your social media strategy involves pictures of dead raccoons, you're doing it wrong.  :o 
 



#11 EGOL

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Posted 03 January 2014 - 06:31 AM

They show their recent projects and they share pictures of different project ideas. People see these posts, and then they want a new kitchen, bath, addition, or whatever else. They might not contact the company right away, but the idea has been planted, and they start considering changes they'd like to see in their own homes. Window shopping can be a powerful thing.

 

I agree that this can happen a lot.  The company who is willing to do this might get a lot of new business.



I might be in the same crowd as EGOL...just too damn old.

 

lol...  Test... do you think you are too old?  Or, do you just walk on paths that are not so well traveled?



#12 earlpearl

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Posted 03 January 2014 - 09:49 AM

The single best endorsement I've seen on the web occurred on FB.  A relative asked friends and family about a product.  She got tremendous responses.  The product was widely praised.  People gave her advice on its best applications, where to buy it and how and when to buy it at the best price.

 

  1. She purchased the product.  ;)    Hell I bought the product!!!!

 

What is better word of mouth (wom) than that?  

 

Social media for an smb is tough.  You aren't a brand.   You aren't well known.   It does require writing.  One doesn't write a masterpiece every time.  Not every picture or video is an instant success.     You have some hits and you have some misses.    A lot of what goes viral is cute, or stunning...but it doesn't speak to the intrinsic values you provide.   Its cute, funny, stunning and entertains folks enough to encourage them to share it.  It may not describe your inherent values.

 

If it grabs eyeballs that helps.   Sometimes that works.   That is the essential idea of most advertising...which is to grab eyeballs.  

 

We keep using social media.  To date for our smb's it doesn't work as well as search.

 

We also work extensively on word of mouth.   We do that in social media, we do it in reviews, and we do it by actually encouraging its spread in a number of different venues.   That has worked extremely well over time.  We have had to experiment to find the ways it works best.   That alone is not easy.  But its not hard either.  It requires persistence.



#13 WPMuse

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Posted 03 January 2014 - 12:22 PM

Lots of great tips and advice here....  I've yet to find a business that cannot find a way to use social media for their business -- if there is a will; there is a way. The will part if what we all agree we cannot control or cajole out of folks.  And if you are doing things only because you "have to" then that will be apparent too. 

 

As far as writing there are great companies that can take care of that for you for a fair price.  So you spend your time or you spend your money.  If you don't want to do either --  you simply cannot expect the results many clients claim to want.

 

The other problem is not just posting great stuff, it's getting that stuff to stay in the stream of any of the top social sites.  You're a flash in the pan and maybe will be seen for a brief point in time before you scroll off to oblivion in likers/follower's streams  -- and that point is most likely only seen by those logged in at that specific time that you hit their stream.  FB has made it more difficult to get found by limiting exposure hoping, just llike g##### that you'll buy ads.   So you buy ads, that get likes, then those who like you may never see you again.  Seems like an uphill battle, right?

 

The bottom line is this is the playing field.  None of us have a choice about that.  So you either play by the rules, keep on plugging, get creative, adding new stuff, creating wonderful visuals that you post and post again and thereby determine what is the best time/day to post.

 

Otherwise your competitors who do are going to be the ones who are seen and therefore will reap the benefits.

 

IWIAAIWIN ~ Queen


Edited by WPMuse, 03 January 2014 - 12:22 PM.


#14 EGOL

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Posted 03 January 2014 - 01:26 PM


 


The other problem is not just posting great stuff, it's getting that stuff to stay in the stream of any of the top social sites.  You're a flash in the pan and maybe will be seen for a brief point in time before you scroll off to oblivion..

 

This is one of the reasons why I do not believe that social is worth my time.  From this perspective social does not scale. You got to be out there constantly and earn every sale.  That's piecework!  

 

When I publish evergreen content on my website the article stays there, competes in the SERPs, and people from social find it and recycle it through social again.  My website visitors do the social work for me.  If you have great content on a website social can be like throwing gasoline on a fire - repeatedly.    But when you put your content on social it rolls of the bottom of the page.


Edited by EGOL, 03 January 2014 - 01:28 PM.


#15 iamlost

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Posted 03 January 2014 - 01:28 PM

There are five huge problems with building on the web: longterm consistent investment in appropriate content.

They are exacerbated with regard to SMB due to inherently fewer resources and innate (small c) conservatism. To utilise the social aspects of the internet (not just SM) requires identifying one's audiences aka market segments, where each congregate, why they do, and how best to leverage each. It also requires hiring (or finding time to do ones self, which does not scale) the necessary content creation and communication means.

There is no one strategy/plan or set of tactics that works for all, for best results each SMB needs to be treated as unique. Indeed, that is perhaps the best filter for identifying those in SMM who tailor delivery (a minuscule minority) and those who can not (the great majority).

SMM requires planning, benchmarking, goals, analysis, adaptation, testing, and much much more.

SMM requires commitment; it is the marketing equivalent of the doubling of results on subsequent chessboard squares: so inconsequential for so long and then a tipping point is reached and a deluge results.

SMM requires an appropriate fit/connection between the business/brand/site and the audience; indeed, it may require variations or even quite different efforts to reach different market segments.

SMM is usually a longterm play; one that can adapt or even reverse course as necessary. It is, in it's essence, customer service. If the effort is aimed at serving the business/brand/site, it will probably fail; if the effort is aimed at serving the business's/brand's/site's existing and potential market audience it will probably succeed.

What does each segment need/want/desire? How can you best deliver each? In a nice way? Unobtrusively.



#16 WPMuse

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Posted 03 January 2014 - 02:14 PM

That's piecework!

 

I hear ya!  ;)  Do it to have an advantage and then do the best you can to take advantage of that advantage!  For some sites I don't bother either -- but for other sites, its a no-brainer that to not be involved is to be left behind.

 

"If you don't have a competitive advantage, don't compete." ~Jack Welch

 



#17 EGOL

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Posted 03 January 2014 - 02:49 PM

"If you don't have a competitive advantage, don't compete." ~Jack Welch
 

 

That's awesome.  

 

For some products, I have stopped selling them because my competitors are vicious discounters.  Insane.  I think that they don't do math so they don't know how much money they are losing.

 

So, I've kind of discovered this but have never realized it before hearing his quote. 



#18 glyn

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Posted 03 January 2014 - 04:26 PM

This is going to be a discussion that will not get a finite answer but a lot of really helpful stuff has already been mentioned. I had the pleasure in completing my masters on visual communication in Facebook and while I do not consider that this makes myself an expert in any way, I can perhaps share some insights that digging stupidly deep into research revealed to me. 

 

Culture impacts big time - cultural noise or interpretation plays a huge role in how messages are interpreted in social networks. What I post to my Facebook page in Italy, can be spat out in China or New Zealand and shown to someone that has a completely different background, by nature of friendships on 2nd and 3rd levels. In the case of FB you image can be read across lots of different cultures instantly. That might or might not be problematic depending on what you do.

 

Context  is everything - the content when sharing messages is largely lost in social networks. If you put up a post to your fan page and this is shown to a friend who was a friend of your page, then they obviously went to your page to like it. But their friends friends didn't, and they might see the posts in the typical Facebook voyeuristic way (people snooping other peoples pages). That means your original message looses all the context when posted that is not written into the post itself. With FB's reliance on visual messaging, it's quite hard to imagine where you put that extra information (who you are, what you do, why you choose this photo, what are your goals and objectives). Therefore every photo needs to be tagged and looked at as a self contained landing/explaining page for the user. I work for hotels and we tag every single photo, explain the meeting rooms, and tag each of the outbound links with Clicky unique shorturls. If someone farts on the FB pages we know what they ate for dinner. This is one way we measure.

 

People and organizations don't explain jack (largely) and there is little way to force a reading of terms - I can't think of one company or organization that I have not consulted on that has a properly written social media policy. I found 17 potential direct benefits of having these things done properly from enhancing the brand, protecting the brand, and limiting liability right the way up to consumer protection. Companies don't explain what they are trying to do with Facebook, or Twitter or Pinterest, it is just a given that people know what they are doing. The guy that doesn't want to respond to FB comments can do that but only if he tells people that he is not going to do so. People need to stand back and ask themselves how these networks could work for them, rather than being driven along by what everyone else is doing. Also it is very difficult to actually be sure that any of your terms or social policies can be read within social networks because apart from the signing up terms very few give moderators any way to push a requirement to accept terms to their users (which sucks by the way).

 

A good approach is simply to make sure that all roads lead to a source that is under your complete ownership. Think about the days when FB started out with fan pages and everyone invested loads of money into their fan pages, got the fans and then FB turned around and said, you can pay to promote to those friends that you spent money getting! Much better to, for example - in the case of EGOL - be posting snippets across your social networks of your articles and to have the read more on your blog where you close them with a form or another kind of enticement. Basically stack your content assets towards your own domains. When I see people liking posts, and following things in Tumblr or whatever I am quite happy because I know that they will have had to come to the main property to get any in-depthness from it. The only reason why I do think posting to networks is a good thing is because it allows you to have some control over the message that is shared. You should see how your pages share on social networks so that amazing visual is actually the one that appears on the feed and not some favicon or random image that is going to do you more damage than good.

 

I have more but I am on holiday and it might get boring!

 

Glyn.



#19 test-ok

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Posted 03 January 2014 - 05:03 PM

lol...  Test... do you think you are too old?  Or, do you just walk on paths that are not so well traveled?

 

too old ?? (depends on how you define too) ;)

But I do think a lot like the older generation.

case in point...(walk on paths that are not so well traveled) 

I like niche forums which IMO is the best social media out there, 

FB isn't a good base for business advertising, remember GM and their FB downfall.... it wasn't created for that purpose and I still don't think it's a good marketing factor, unless your site is social in nature.

Keeping with the flooring contractor, wouldn't he be better served by being active in a flooring forum or contractors forum where he can post his works, answer questions etc. 

I just don't fall for the Social Media hype.



#20 WPMuse

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Posted 03 January 2014 - 07:54 PM

I have more but I am on holiday and it might get boring!

 

You are never boring, Glyn!  Thanks for taking some time out for the post -- that's a keeper! :applause: Now, go enjoy the rest of your holiday! 


Edited by WPMuse, 03 January 2014 - 07:57 PM.


#21 bwelford

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Posted 03 January 2014 - 10:14 PM

I'm a little surprised that this thread talks mostly about content as if that's text content.  Images are great for grabbing attention quickly and most of the social media allow you to upload images.  If you have little time for all this, I would spend that time on figuring out how I can show some images to get on the radar screen.



#22 test-ok

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Posted 03 January 2014 - 10:26 PM

 I would spend that time on figuring out how I can show some images to get on the radar screen.

Join a niche forum, the best place to get on the radar with others who hold the same interest...No?



#23 clandestino

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Posted 07 January 2014 - 05:22 AM

I would never go looking for a construction contractor on Facebook, never in a million years, however I'd expect to see some pictures of their work on their site along with all the essential information.

 

I don't think I would either.  But, if I'm trying to decide if a contractor is a "real business" and will deliver on his/her promises, I'd check the internet, to include Facebook, to see if it looked as though he/she had the resources to do the work.  If they can't even put up a decent website with supporting social media, that tells me they are a small player and might not be able to deliver -- I'd have to dig deeper.  If they did a professional job on Facebook etc., that might be enough to establish the credibility I would need to see to move forward.

 

It's about building your Brand and the Credibility that comes along with it.  No credibility, not trust.  No trust, no sales.

 

 

That's exactly what I was going after...if my friends started posting that stuff...they would be gone..IMO that's nothing more than social spam...No?

 

Set up a separate business page so you don't have to bombard your family with posts related your business.  However, you could invite them to look at your business page and give you advice about it's layout -- everybody likes to give advice, don't they? ;)  I would think your family would do you a personal favor, wouldn't they?

 

Also, if all you do is bombard your prospects with ads, they will ditch you faster than your family will.  It's best to build a relationship and the trust that comes with it.  It helps to be interesting and give them a reason to come back.  Apply some marketing creativity and the neuro-science of influence.  Buy this, buy this, buy this, buy this, doesn't work in person and it doesn't work on the internet any better.

 

If you can network in person, you can do it on the internet even faster.  There are tools that let you post to more than one profile simultaneously.

 

If you're not interesting in person, or on the internet, then entrepreneurship might be the wrong choice. 

 

You can create a competitive advantage through good marketing.  Find a way to make it easier for your customers to use social media to get what they want from you than having to go all the way over to the store.  Or worse yet, having to wait until the contractor shows up.  Or having to try to track him/her down.  And once you've hired him/her, waiting for the project to get done when he/she doesn't seem to be showing up on a regular basis.  Hmmmmmmmm....... with a little creativity, that might be a good approach -- contractors managing expectations via social media.  They have serious time and distance issues, as well as subs that don't perform and suppliers that don't deliver.  They can't be everywhere but, in my experience, they could always do a better job of communicating.  If people just knew what the plan was, they wouldn't get upset.

 

That could inject an element of reality into the relationship.  When prospects see the kinds of problems that come up and how they are quickly solved, that will affect their expectations going into the relationship -- when providing services, success is most often determined at the "setting expectations" stage.  Seeing the kinds of problems that come up and the solutions can build trust because the prospect sees how a project really goes and they know you're not blowing smoke up their butt.  You'd have to be interested in solving problems on a timely basis, though.  If the best you can do is always be 4 weeks late, this might not work very well.  Of course, if that's that case it's not a matter of better marketing, it's a matter of better management and probably lack of financial resources.  It's hard to sell bad services.  As a matter of fact, the quickest way to go out of business that I know of is to have an incredible marketing, PR, Advertising program and really bad service.


Edited by chuckfinley, 07 January 2014 - 03:45 PM.
change our of business to out of business


#24 clandestino

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Posted 07 January 2014 - 05:33 AM

This is one of the reasons why I do not believe that social is worth my time.  From this perspective social does not scale. You got to be out there constantly and earn every sale.  That's piecework!


Done right, the results can grow exponentially, though.



Lots of great tips and advice here....  I've yet to find a business that cannot find a way to use social media for their business -- if there is a will; there is a way. The will part if what we all agree we cannot control or cajole out of folks.  And if you are doing things only because you "have to" then that will be apparent too. 

 

Amen



IWIAAIWIN ~ Queen

 



#25 clandestino

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Posted 07 January 2014 - 06:13 AM

10 Surprising Social Media Statistics That Will Make You Rethink Your Social Strategy

Know what the fastest-growing demographic on Twitter is? Or how many new members join LinkedIn every second? The answers will surprise you!



#26 clandestino

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Posted 07 January 2014 - 05:10 PM

This is one of the reasons why I do not believe that social is worth my time.  From this perspective social does not scale. You got to be out there constantly and earn every sale.  That's piecework!  

 

You're right about the continuous exposure that's required.

 

One thing you can do to help is hire someone to do general posts related to the industry.  There are lots of people out there who can do it and they work pretty cheap.  I've also been impressed with the interesting things they come up with in their research.  I think it may be because they're looking at it with "fresh eyes," much like your customers do.  In managing a sales team, one of the things that happens the longer a salesperson is on the line is they become experts and then they stop selling.  They start taliking about all their new found knowledge which is kind of exciting to them and they quit talking about things that are important to average persons that know nothing about the subject.

 

That social media person would help you build credibilty also because your customers would see a continuous flow of information which would suggest a Brand with resources.  That builds credibility that leads to trust.  It impossible to sell to people that don't trust you and its the hardest hurdle to get past in the selling cycle.

 

When your part time staff have the day to day down, you can get involved in "engagement" of your customers.  Relationship building if you will.  I could write a book on how to do that.  You can work smarter rather than harder though.

 

Somewhere I read that Donald Trump would call influencers that he needed to keep in contact with during lunch knowing they wouldn't be available.  He would leave a message, that way he maintained the contact without having to spend 30 minutes plus on the phone with them.

 

Maybe in this day and age, text messages would serve a similar purpose.  Or maybe Twitter?  Or Facebook? Or?  You get the idea, it doesn't have to be time consuming if you're smart about how you go about it, and you are smart.

 

An idea that just popped into CRAM (Chuck's Random Access Memory - which is more random these days than I'd like, :) ), maybe a good start point would be to create a Twitter Group for your Influencers.  Give them a reason to want to come and connect with you.  This could be a small scale test as well as a learning opportunity -- then scale to the hundereds of different niches that could produce for you.

 

I would search for -- guy kawasaki social media --and read about how Guy became the number one speaker at all of the UGC Symposiums.  He built Alltop based on social media, and with a lot of time on Twitter.  He basically did what I suggested above.  Having said that, he spent a lot of time doing the posting himself to start.  He was out on the front lines learning with all the rest of us.  (He did use robots too to cover the globe, though.)  After he understood how, he hired people to do the day to day, but still posts himself -- I think its because its a little addicting.  We had a lot of fun with it back in the early days.  If you shot Guy a DM, he'd always answer back even with info that others would try to hide to protect their competitive position.  He's a stand up guy (excuse the pun, it just happened).

 

Note: Twitter is the perfect tool to drive prospects to your blog.


Edited by chuckfinley, 07 January 2014 - 08:07 PM.
gr knows to know


#27 EGOL

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Posted 07 January 2014 - 06:14 PM

Thanks for the perspective, Chuck.



#28 WPMuse

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Posted 08 January 2014 - 10:50 AM

10 Surprising Social Media Statistics That Will Make You Rethink Your Social Strategy

Know what the fastest-growing demographic on Twitter is? Or how many new members join LinkedIn every second? The answers will surprise you!

 

Actually, I wasn't so surprised ...  IMNSHO, the demographic noted in this article isn't getting online to buy things, download music or be marketed to.  From my own personal experience and interactions I see that age group is reluctantly getting online to be part of a movement (at least here in the States) to do their part to be informed and be involved.  Social is becoming a great organizer for like minds, as many in this age group feel, to change the direction the United States has taken due to our Government no longer being one guided by our founding principles and the Constitution. 

 

Yeah, they may buy some stuff here and there and may click on an ad or two.  But that demographic appears to be laser focused in why they are online, (and it ain't for fun and games) what they are involved in and what sites they participate on. 

 

With that said, I don't get the g#####+ stats....



#29 clandestino

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Posted 08 January 2014 - 04:00 PM

Actually, I wasn't so surprised ...  IMNSHO, the demographic noted in this article isn't getting online to buy things, download music or be marketed to.

 

I think the idea is that this is the next wave of consumers -- as their income grows, and assuming they can find a job, they will buy lots of things.  Let's hope the "New Normal" ends, much as Carter's "New Normal" ended when Reagan applied sound management principles to government.

 

Having said that, though, young people do buy a lot of electronics consumer goods.  They are gadget addicts.  I remember Guy Kawasaki putting up a blog post with pictures of the Stanford Shopping Center in Palo Alto (a highly affluent area and shopping center/mall here in Silicon Vallley) and all the stores were having 50-70% off sales while the Apple Store had lines around the block to buy at full price.  That'll tell you something.   I don't think the millennials much care about the conservative movement, they tend to be much more libertarian.  They do seriously care about being spied on by the NSA, though, because it touches technology.

 

I also noted from that article that social media is performing a national public service -- apparently all the porn addicts are on social media now? :)  I guess it serves a rehabilitative effect? :D





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