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This Content Costed Buckets Of Money - Hundreds Of Buckets


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#1 EGOL

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Posted 22 August 2015 - 08:56 AM

You hear about people buying articles for five dollars to twenty-five dollars.   You have probably seen those numbers before.   It is very unusual to hear people talking about hundred dollar content, and most people don't believe that some websites have thousand dollar content.   Would you believe that some publishers spend five digits, maybe six digits, to produce a single page of content? 

 

It's out there.

 

Now, take a look at this page of content on The Washington Post.   It starts off with a substantive video of about ten minutes.  That video cost major bucks.  Imagine the cost of getting authors and film staff down to New Orleans, getting them in touch with all of the people interviewed, paying for plane tickets, paying for motels, paying for meals - and they didn't stay there just a couple of days.  The cost included rental cars, boats, drones, and things that I can think of.  They supplemented the footage that they produced with footage that was licensed from others. 

 

That video at the top is just one of four substantive videos that appear on this page  --  along with graphics and photos and a nice big article.  

 

I don't have any inside information on who paid for this content.  The Washington Post probably didn't pay the full cost of producing this because some of the people involved probably gave their time, or boat rides or other types of help, just to showcase their own work or contribute to "getting out the word on an issue that they think is important".  Regardless, someone decided that this story was so worth telling (and this is just one publication retelling this story today), that they put this kind of money into it.  Was it done just to get the story out or was it done because it makes business sense?  I can understand both of those and think that it might succeed at either. 

 

All, I can say for sure is that The Washington Post got my money for a yearly subscription because they publish lots of content with at least a four digit price tag that I think is pretty good.  If I continue my subscription for the rest of my life, I might pay for a couple articles.

 

I am not advocating that every page of content should get this much investment.  That would be crazy.  But, I would advocate that the five and ten dollar content buyers think about how well their content is going to rank in the SERPs and if it is even worth putting onto their websites.  Maybe they should publish less but publish better.  I think that most of the five dollar stuff has become more dead weight, if not holes through the bottom of the boat. 



#2 earlpearl

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Posted 22 August 2015 - 11:28 AM

EGOL:   I've been following your suggestions on content and being  "anonymous" for a long time.  As far as I recall you have been consistent with your comments for a decade:  Produce great content.   I guess that means it works for you.  

 

OKAY.  I, for one believe you.     B:)    I do.

 

Content is tough.  Great content takes quality writers, research, much thought, organization, and practice.  Then it probably takes some other things also.  Resources or at least $$ is part of it.   The newspapers have really suffered.  They have cut tons of writers.    Consider the dismal state of newspaper revenues and profits...or losses from 2000 going forward.  Here is some data from 2000 updated through 2013:   Extensive data set:   Its dismal.   Alternatively just look at the graphs.

 

Hey, one of those graphs shows how google's revenues have been soaring while print media's revenues have crashed!!!!!!    But those SOB's don't put the money into content.   They take and scrape yours....and then republish it.   I guess they put it into cars and wearables and other stuff.

 

On the other hand quality content does work on the web.  One might just produce and publish it...but one might also have to push it out into the possible world of linker's and referencers...to get it noticed.   

 

I live in the DC area.  I get and read the Post.  Been doing it for decades.  On an anecdotal basis 2 of our smb's advertised in the Post or other print media.   With one we placed classified advertising every single day, 7 days/ week.  Never missed a day.   Probably around 2 decades.   We prepaid for months.  We were a small but excellent customer.  

 

It slowly stopped driving traffic.  We evaluated sources of leads...since the 1980's.  During the 2000's it stopped producing.  We cut back.  And then we stopped.  We revived it for a while.  But we had to stop.  We were spending money and lousy lousy results.  Our experience speaks to the graphs above.

 

The other had a different demographic.  We used the Post and other print media.  We used them at different intervals.  Those print media also slowed down and stopped producing during the 2000's.    So we cut back on those sources.   Our experiences reflect the aggregate picture of those graphs above.

 

No doubt great content does win.  We have produced some...even though that isn't our focus.  Our focus is LOCAL which operates somewhat differently on the web.

 

Excellent article.  REALLY GREAT CONTENT.  I hope New Orleans doesn't sink away!!!!!


Edited by earlpearl, 22 August 2015 - 02:00 PM.


#3 bobbb

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Posted 22 August 2015 - 04:08 PM

Video is National Geographic quality. Will have to watch again. Had trouble figuring out who was on what side of the issue



#4 earlpearl

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Posted 22 August 2015 - 06:13 PM

Video is National Geographic quality. Will have to watch again. Had trouble figuring out who was on what side of the issue

 

Interesting.  One issue with media content in the States (and I expect in other nations) is that its instantly branded...right or left and politicized.  When the perspective from one outside of the States is that one can't tell which (political perspective) it has...well that is a positive as to the straight out reporting and quality of the content.



#5 EGOL

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Posted 22 August 2015 - 07:02 PM

In the United States there are also lots of special interest and corporate groups who publish their own sides of the story.  They can spend more money on getting their word out than would ever make business sense for a publisher. 

 

One of my sites is thought to be an industry portal by many people.  I get lots of email from people demanding to know who is supporting the website.  More often I am getting email from people who are trying to steer the content of my site in their direction or get their content promoted.  I gotta be careful because they can be tricky.  I should start p***ing these guys off because they are the ones who would pay more to own my site than anyone who has business sense.


Edited by EGOL, 22 August 2015 - 07:04 PM.


#6 bobbb

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Posted 22 August 2015 - 08:36 PM

In all honesty I was disturbed twice while watching it so I missed parts. It became incomplete which is why I need to view it again.

 

Yes there is a pause button. Never occurred to me.



#7 EGOL

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Posted 23 August 2015 - 07:33 AM

They are publishing more on NO.

 

http://www.washingto...resilience-lab/

 

If you have related content you keep getting more and more pageviews.



#8 bobbb

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Posted 23 August 2015 - 10:01 AM

They are publishing more on NO.

So I did get it. The first was YES.



#9 earlpearl

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Posted 23 August 2015 - 12:23 PM

In the United States there are also lots of special interest and corporate groups who publish their own sides of the story.  They can spend more money on getting their word out than would ever make business sense for a publisher. 

 

One of my sites is thought to be an industry portal by many people.  I get lots of email from people demanding to know who is supporting the website.  More often I am getting email from people who are trying to steer the content of my site in their direction or get their content promoted.  I gotta be careful because they can be tricky.  I should start p***ing these guys off because they are the ones who would pay more to own my site than anyone who has business sense.

Oh that just stinks.  Some special interest groups will try and buy this site for big big bucks.   Change the content and start slanting it to whatever policies their big money supporters will want; all the while never saying anything to the public.  So much for facts!!!!!



#10 EGOL

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Posted 23 August 2015 - 06:01 PM

Oh that just stinks.

 

Any big organization or company who has lobbyists is probably publishing blogs, sending out newsletters, running ads, buying TV commercials, and more to promote their point of view.  If that group is the target of taxation, the recipient of tax credits, subjected to regulation, or have business related to bills under consideration, then they are going to be bugging bloggers and webmasters and influentials on social media who have an audience in their niche.  They can be incredibly nice, sickening sweet, plain pushy, even threatening depending upon how your content aligns with their interest.



#11 EGOL

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Posted 25 August 2015 - 06:51 AM

The stories from New Orleans on the Washington Post keep coming....

 

http://www.washingto...bfd2_story.html



#12 TheAlex

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Posted 27 August 2015 - 03:43 PM

Could these stories be in conjunction with a (local) TV station as a way to share the budget costs? I started to notice the same content and interviews on my local radio station that I'd already read in the local newspaper a couple of years ago.



#13 EGOL

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Posted 28 August 2015 - 07:23 PM

Could these stories be in conjunction with a (local) TV station as a way to share the budget costs? I started to notice the same content and interviews on my local radio station that I'd already read in the local newspaper a couple of years ago.

 

That's possible.  Makes sense. 





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