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What Killer Metrics Do You Use For A) Content B) E-Commerce


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#1 glyn

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Posted 31 October 2017 - 08:49 AM

I'm doing a reporting dashboard at the moment and wanted to ask my learned friends about any metrics they find particularly helpful when working either with a) Content b) E-commerce websites.
 
For example, I love:
 
  • e-commerce conversion rate - to help me understand the impact on on-site mechanisms, for example I put a popup on the website and then see whether there was an increase in conversion on the website.
  • arrival/landing page visits with search segment - to help me understand whether google search is sending me more traffic or less traffic based on a link-building campaign.
  • assisted conversions - I like to do content grouping (for example a blog) to see the impact of the strategy on a) revenue b) time on page. I can then set a long lookback window.
 
new visitors / returning visitors
I would like to show that certain activities bring increases in certain type of people. For example if you push certain type of "discovery search" - for example location or destination based generic searches it would be good tp see whether or not it increased the share of BRAND NEW visitors to the website. I'd love to understand how to get a segment of new visitors. As stiil Google manages to fool me with their use of terms for this.
 
Please feel free to chip in!
 
Glyn

Edited by glyn, 31 October 2017 - 04:09 PM.


#2 earlpearl

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Posted 31 October 2017 - 03:06 PM

I read the above and contemplated it for some time.  Frankly I'd love to learn the above also.  At this point I have little respect for web metrics for our services.  Its simply that the time and decision gap between clicking on a site, reading and contemplating its services and then deciding on whether to buy or not buy, or to store it away for future considerations...IS HUGE.  At least in all our cases.

 

For our local services we do know that certain very focused locational keywords DO convert at a better rate.  They are the one's that tend to PINPOINT the location very closely.  In our cases it would pin the locations to something akin to a neighborhood or a geo term that is both proximate or covers us and yet is a bit wider. 

 

While I can't speak to all the descriptors we have 2 smbs in Northern Virginia outside of Washington DC.  locational terms that use Northern VA or Northern Virginia or NOVA or some of those variants convert well.

 

Why why?   Its a pretty vast area with possibly 2+ million people in its region.  I can venture good guesstimates for that phraseology but I am aware it converts well.  Why is it better than others on a percentage basis???   Not sure...but it has worked well for close to two decades.

 

I only wish it were the most popular descriptive locational phrase out there.  ITS NOT.  Its far from it.  But it works.



#3 EGOL

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Posted 31 October 2017 - 05:59 PM

Rankings don't mean anything anymore because Google has so many ads at the top, ads at the side, featured snippets, instant answers, people also ask, etc.  We have our best rankings ever but it produces 1/2 as much traffic because Google is becoming a better webmaster  and using their site for their own purposes.  Revenue doesn't mean anything anymore, traffic doesn't mean much. 

 

So, for a retail site, my number is going to be net profit.

 

And, for an information site my number is average years-to-break even for article content.



#4 earlpearl

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Posted 31 October 2017 - 07:11 PM

Rankings don't mean anything anymore because Google has so many ads at the top, ads at the side, featured snippets, instant answers, people also ask, etc.  We have our best rankings ever but it produces 1/2 as much traffic because Google is becoming a better webmaster  and using their site for their own purposes.  Revenue doesn't mean anything anymore, traffic doesn't mean much. 

 

So, for a retail site, my number is going to be net profit.

 

And, for an information site my number is average years-to-break even for article content.

 

From what I gather Iamlost is getting a lot of traffic off of social media.  Its how to crack that in a way that simulates the intent element that search provides.  "luxury hotel in london" is a search phrase that shows very specific INTENT....its a better buying signal.  

 

Seeing that my friend stayed at a luxury hotel in London is not the same thing.   But its how to capture that social media crowd in a way that simulates the essence of an intent phrase is one of my goals.



#5 iamlost

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Posted 31 October 2017 - 10:10 PM

Note: sites are evergreen info; conversions are ads and affiliate presell including coupons.

The following are five primary metrics (in alpha order) stripped back to basics; note that I do NOT view any in isolation but rather in tuples of at least two.

Bounce Rate against Landing Page Conversion Rate.
I've written about BR before including How Many Bounces Could A Bounce Rate Have? and given that there are so many, including unknowable reasons, that it is best viewed against something else such as LCR.
Basically this compares bounces (came and left) and conversions (came and converted); entry page spectrum ends results.

Conversion Rate of page against category and site.
Let's say the page is 'double chocolate cake extreme'; one might contrast CR on it against the entire 'chocolate cake' category and also against the entire 'cake' site.

Referrer and Referrer category against Conversion Rate.
Those of you where the answer is Google have it easy. :) However, I have 3+SEs, 6+SMplatforms, a host of sites referring visitors and a fair bit of direct traffic.
So, let's say I have a SM site referring visitors; one might contrast the CR of it's traffic against that of otherSM sites and against all other categories of referrers.

Return Visitors: Visit Frequency against Visit Conversion Rate.
Differentiating visitors by the number visits in a period, i.e. per month, and the average CR of each segment.

Visitor Devices against Conversion Rate.
Pretty obvious: Android users' CR against iOS CR against Win CR against MacOS CR...; mobile against tablet against laptop against desktop.

ALL my primary metrics are to do with revenue either indirectly, i.e. CR, or directly, i.e. dollars earned. Any metrics not dealing with revenue are supporting those that do.



#6 earlpearl

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Posted 01 November 2017 - 12:08 PM

Note: sites are evergreen info; conversions are ads and affiliate presell including coupons.

The following are five primary metrics (in alpha order) stripped back to basics; note that I do NOT view any in isolation but rather in tuples of at least two.

Bounce Rate against Landing Page Conversion Rate.
I've written about BR before including How Many Bounces Could A Bounce Rate Have? and given that there are so many, including unknowable reasons, that it is best viewed against something else such as LCR.
Basically this compares bounces (came and left) and conversions (came and converted); entry page spectrum ends results.

Conversion Rate of page against category and site.
Let's say the page is 'double chocolate cake extreme'; one might contrast CR on it against the entire 'chocolate cake' category and also against the entire 'cake' site.

Referrer and Referrer category against Conversion Rate.
Those of you where the answer is Google have it easy. :) However, I have 3+SEs, 6+SMplatforms, a host of sites referring visitors and a fair bit of direct traffic.
So, let's say I have a SM site referring visitors; one might contrast the CR of it's traffic against that of otherSM sites and against all other categories of referrers.

Return Visitors: Visit Frequency against Visit Conversion Rate.
Differentiating visitors by the number visits in a period, i.e. per month, and the average CR of each segment.

Visitor Devices against Conversion Rate.
Pretty obvious: Android users' CR against iOS CR against Win CR against MacOS CR...; mobile against tablet against laptop against desktop.

ALL my primary metrics are to do with revenue either indirectly, i.e. CR, or directly, i.e. dollars earned. Any metrics not dealing with revenue are supporting those that do.

I like the above.  I've experienced elements of it.

 

On metrics: Our only effective metrics are sales and revenues.  Web metrics MOSTLY don't get us near anything that is valuable.  Its because our local smb's are not ecommerce and they are involved services.  Involved services means that there is a gap between contacts and a sale.  That gap is mostly covered by an involved process between our teams and the potential customers.  The web doesn't get us there.

 

BUT....I do see the value on matching metrics.  I see where it works.  On the Referrer and Referrer Category as an example: We have two types of services.  One primarily applies to people who are younger and less affluent.  The other service primarily applies to people who are generally older and more affluent.

 

On the referrer and referrer category:  Boy Instagram is working well for the younger category (against other categories).  For the older more affluent folks, instagram hasn't had any impact.

 

We are growing our instagram efforts and "followers" for the service that applies to the younger folks.   We didn't know any of this until we started experimenting with it.





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