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How Do I Use Facebook For Marketing?


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#1 tommr

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Posted 25 January 2016 - 10:20 AM

I wonder if anyone has a suggestions of where I can find answers to some of my facebook questions.

 

I don't want to clog up the forum with silly questions.

 

 

thanks



#2 cre8pc

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Posted 25 January 2016 - 10:41 AM

This is a great question!  So many people are doing it incorrectly.  

 

I recently experienced a conversation with someone complaining about Facebook. It was her opinion that Facebook is for friends and family and under no circumstances should it be used to promote someone's business.  That belongs on a separate business page.  

 

Facebook set up "Pages" for that reason. However, a huge number of people, including myself, have used their personal FB page to invite friends to something from work.  For example, I may have an article published and want my friends and family to see it or share the news with them.  They don't belong to my business page (some do).

 

There are people who post in FB 20, 30 times a day, with duplicate posts over several accounts that, if you follow all of them, means you see the duplicates.  

 

There's definitely room for improvement as far as how we use Facebook.  

 

Marketing advice by the pro's is welcome!



#3 glyn

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Posted 25 January 2016 - 11:19 AM

Ask all your questions. :)

 

What I would say is that you whatever social media network you are using, you need to first define how you will use it. What function will the social media network have for your business. Every business will have a different purpose and angle. A very large proportion of people have utter cr** in their FB channels because they were either forced along the road to having a presence without spending the time to think about how it would/could work strategically or they simply did not think about it.

 

A good guiding principle is that your FB page or any other 3rd part network onto which you hook a company profile will over time seek to squeeze juice out of you whether it's paid advertisements, pushing stuff to your friends, etc etc... Just look at what happens on PINTEREST if you are not registered nowadays and look at more than a few pins. The platforms don't care either they will slap your presence with a registration form overlay because they are that desperate and incompetent at monetizing their platforms. They didn't think about it properly beforehand. I mean it is frankly embarrassing to see.

 

So my takeaway from this is define the network and what you want to use it for and how it will contribute to your business and how you will measure that it is doing to say that it is delivering against your definition.

 

G.



#4 tommr

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Posted 25 January 2016 - 12:13 PM

Thanks,
At the risk of looking stupid I don't even know how to post what where.
For example.
Recently I performed an experiment.
I posted a photograph to a group of which I am a member.  To date it has received just about 1000 likes and 352 shares, this group has about 8000 members as far as I can tell.
I shared the same photo, from the group to my FB page and it received about 50 likes and no shares as I can tell and I have about 270 friends and probably 30 followers.
I wonder if I should be doing it the other way around?
That is to post to my page and share to groups?
Does this even matter?

Also, I see a lot of stuff posted that is interesting.  If I like this stuff will it clog up the feed with a bunch of "tom like this"?
Maybe I should create separate groups for thinks like my photography?

I have searched around but I have not been able to find what I am looking for as far as specific examples of how to use Facebook with out p***ing every one off. 
I am aware that political and religions posts have this effect.

 

Oh and one more thing.  
This particular photograph has about 65 comments.  I asked before about this but one thing I did not consider is if I go through and like these comments and reply to some is my feed going to be clogged up with "tom roberts liked this"?  Would that not be annoying to others?


Edited by tommr, 25 January 2016 - 12:21 PM.


#5 MarketingCy

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Posted 31 January 2016 - 04:51 PM

Recently I performed an experiment.
I posted a photograph to a group of which I am a member.  To date it has received just about 1000 likes and 352 shares, this group has about 8000 members as far as I can tell.
I shared the same photo, from the group to my FB page and it received about 50 likes and no shares as I can tell and I have about 270 friends and probably 30 followers.
 

 

This is called correct online marketing, otherwise, targeted advertisement!



#6 tommr

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Posted 01 February 2016 - 12:24 AM

I guess I was wondering if I can have ads on my facebook business page.  

I don't know if there is a bench mark or what I should be trying to do.
Here is an example of a post from the other day.

 

 

fbook.jpg

Is this good?  OK?  Not so good?

I started facebook with the idea of marketing because I need to eat but other than posting stuff I am lost.



 


Edited by tommr, 01 February 2016 - 12:33 AM.


#7 glyn

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Posted 01 February 2016 - 05:15 AM

Facebook is the biggest of the social networks, but the way you need to think about it is just like all the others: First you need to define how you are going to use it. What you are suffering from is the thing that most of these networks are happy for you to be in, in terms of a situation: being led by the platform and not your business. It's very easy to throw money at the web. Just try using one of the remarketing lists that Google has avaialble in remarketing and watch your money burn. I know as I've "tested" this. Go have a look at view through conversions, whereby you are being told that conversions are happening but in fact the people aren't clicking on your banner, they are just infected, see here:

 

Facebook is not exempt either:

 

Whatever steps are taken to combat this are going to be curcumvented by spammers. Spammers are a problem tha can cost you money, so you just need to be mindful of that and take steps to mitigate.

 

You do an ad in Facebook and could find that your ad will be clicked by robots that are simply clicking on ads in order to make a software robot make a fake profile look more like a human. Equally, there are tools, http://bestmacros.co...ds-clicker-bot/, that will click your competitors out of their revenue.

 

In this situation the platform managing companies win because they still get their revenue, you the advertiser lose.

 

If you run a Facebook campaign using the Promote Post option you will be thrown through a very broad category of people. Which opens yourself up to a whole host of potentially revenue ruining campaigns. I imagine something similar will happen if you use Adwords Express.

 

First off then, it's really important to use GEO based targeting for any campaign you are running. If you are doing FB, go through the advertising panel and don't click the promote post button. In this way you will be able to select all the advanced demographics, and limit bleed. Then you should also limit age etc...

 

Images are very key, and in the case that you are running a campaign and not promoting a post, I use a range of photos. Go wild, and use photos that have differing colours and messages. You can run those ads on a CPM for a couple of days to see what the best type of image is, and then flip the campaign to a CPC.

 

Timing is very important, because chances are your segment is not into M-commerce, so doing ads in the evening might be better for you were you doing some kind of e-commerce, or at least run during the lunch-time when people are in front of their computer.

 

Facebook is still a bit of social hang-out and while there are those that will no doubt have great stories about how e-commerce is converting for them, in my experience this is simply not the case. However, FB is very good at lead-generation. As I mentioned before think about sending people to a page where they can enter their email address for something. I remember a few years ago seeing a website that was using ad-words to simply capture people at the early research stages of their conversion funnel and they would hit them up with a nice article, that solves the problem the user was having but then ask if you wanted to receive a mothly tip for productivity. A similar thing could be thought out for your busines.

 

Facebook also have a pixel tracking script that you can install on your website and then chase people, like Google remarketing, through Facebook.You can also segment people based on where they have bene on your own website. Which means that you can then create separate landing pages for each of those segments and have your little remarketing robots go and and try and engage them (EG: create a segment of people that just looked at the page about this type of floor).

 

Make sure your website has goals setup. If they are email addresses that people click on then tag them with a google event and turn it into a goal: http://webris.org/cr...ogle-analytics/, with form submits again a goal. Then you can look back at campaigns and the leads they created for you. Think also about using call tracking, https://www.calltrackingmetrics.com/, so you can track all the different campaigns and see which turn into leads.

 

Once you have setup your conversion funnels with a start point that reflects the intent of your audiences at different stages of the journey, and you have the landing pages that address that audience intent, it is then is sooooo much easier to go off and do media buying.

 

Typically I spend at least 2 weeks on a landing page, 3 weeks running multivariate testing and then a month tweaking the campaigns. Then they just get left on and I move on to the next segment. The pages convert at around 30/40%, which is compared to a pre-planning conversion of around 3%. A conversion rate is heavily influenced by the offer so I am under no illusion that I have  good offer, but this is the approach to follow. I'm also a big fan of one-question on-site surveys. Just ask one question about what the hell people are doing on your website. For example: researching flooring, looking to install flooring, casual browsing. Whatever it is, make sure that the answers allow you to take a decision on where your marketing $$ should be going.

 

In this way you can then go to whichever website or advertising platform you want and measure everything. Then move on to the next one.

 

If you do all the work up front then when you go and spend money on advertising you will make allot more back, but if you do it the other way around - first spend without planning out your strategy - you will end up wasting all your money and coming away thinking it doesn't work.

 

And there is no one-size fits alls solution. You literally have to crawl each website manually in person and test them out. Then you'll find a nugget, and build brick one of your empire.

 

I'm now going to go and build another remarketing army.

 

Glyn.



#8 fisicx

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Posted 01 February 2016 - 08:15 AM

Great post by Glyn.

 

FB marketing works really well if it's done by other people. By that I mean people who like your stuff and then talk about it on FB. What doesn't work is you talking about your stuff. Unless it's an advert. But as Glyn says these are getting knobbled.

 

So what you want is people to post about your business, to upload your images and go WOW! these are great. The image needs to a webpage that sells the images.



#9 tommr

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Posted 01 February 2016 - 09:35 AM

Yeah interesting video about buying likes.
I guess I was not thinking about buying likes as I doubt they would be genuinely interested in buying my photography.

 

 What doesn't work is you talking about your stuff. Unless it's an advert. 

 

So what you want is people to post about your business, to upload your images and go WOW! these are great. The image needs to a webpage that sells the images.

What do you mean by the what doesn't work comment?
You mean ME commenting on my content, because I sometimes comment on someone elses comment and with others I just like.
I mean if someone comments "beautiful" they very likely could be making the same observation I was when I took the photo and I can hardly take credit for that but if they say "nice photo" I often say "thank you" or make brief comment answering a question.

It looks like I can get people to comment, but this facebook thing is so mixed up ...
It doesn't make sense to spend money here.
I an thinking the best course of action here is to create content people like and offer a call to action or funnel them to my website where I can sell them what they want.
And the key to share or have others share a photo on other sites that have interested and engaging fans.

One last thing, I wonder what is considered engagement?  A word like.  "Wow" or does it need to be a proper sentence?  or "I like this photo"?
Because it seems like what I get are snippet comments like "nice photo" and so on.





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