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Amazon Review Site - Getting Those Critical Pictures


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#1 optisite

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Posted 03 May 2016 - 04:55 PM

With (2) sites beyond the conception phase, they'll  grow up to be young and healthy Amazon sites - which will provide in-depth reviews of products.

But what are really needed are pictures.

Some review sites have some of the same images as on Amazon.  So they either scavenge or obtain through the stores' affiliate pm.
Are most Amazon stores open to forwarding their picture products onto affiliates?

Manually snapping pics myself would mean buying the items and then returning them later, which isn't feasible, and these are specialty products that aren't available locally, so -- what do most review sites do?

Anyone have an Amazon review site?

 



#2 tam

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Posted 03 May 2016 - 05:26 PM

What do you mean by Amazon review site? If you mean affiliate then you can use the images supplied by Amazon. I imagine to get anywhere you need to add value though and that means detailed content and images people can't get just by going to Amazon straight off. I'm not sure you'll succeed at in depth reviewing without your hands on the item you are reviewing.

 

Amazon blocks users that return items at an above average rate - that doesn't seem like a great way forward. You could contact the manufacturer directly though and see if they are willing to send them out to you in exchange for the promotion you'll provide.

 

You could try user generated images and comments, track down people online who have brought the item and ask to use their images or for them to take you images in return for something (cash/vouchers) but it's going to be hit and miss on quality and you won't get a cohesive image style.



#3 EGOL

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Posted 03 May 2016 - 07:07 PM

Manually snapping pics myself would mean buying the items and then returning them later, which isn't feasible, and these are specialty products that aren't available locally, so -- what do most review sites do?

 

Maybe you should buy them, and use them, and keep them, and then you will really know what you are talking about when you write the reveiws.   Buy stuff that you need and want. Then the merchandise costs you really nothing.



#4 optisite

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Posted 03 May 2016 - 08:49 PM

What do you mean by Amazon review site? If you mean affiliate then you can use the images supplied by Amazon. I imagine to get anywhere you need to add value though and that means detailed content and images people can't get just by going to Amazon straight off. I'm not sure you'll succeed at in depth reviewing without your hands on the item you are reviewing.

 

Amazon blocks users that return items at an above average rate - that doesn't seem like a great way forward. You could contact the manufacturer directly though and see if they are willing to send them out to you in exchange for the promotion you'll provide.

 

You could try user generated images and comments, track down people online who have brought the item and ask to use their images or for them to take you images in return for something (cash/vouchers) but it's going to be hit and miss on quality and you won't get a cohesive image style.


By an Amazon Review site: I simply meant an Amazon affiliate site, that reviews products, some of which have links leading to Amazon.

Direct to manufacture is probably the way to go.

But there is only one way to get unique picture quality - get my hands on the items. Continuing the cycle.

Thanx, Tam

 

 

Maybe you should buy them, and use them, and keep them, and then you will really know what you are talking about when you write the reveiws.   Buy stuff that you need and want. Then the merchandise costs you really nothing.


Egol,  for one reason or another I envision you scrawling this out in comfy slips from some high castle turret

Let's say the items are drones. Am I gonna spend 15k plus on a fleet of drones, some of which crash and burn, some of which collect dust strung from the ceiling in the coming decades, and a few of which, could possibly be sent off  to verify, really, if that blond guy in glasses actually is giggling by flickering lamplight, amid the dark shadowy stone in the sky?

THX
 


Edited by optisite, 03 May 2016 - 08:50 PM.


#5 EGOL

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Posted 03 May 2016 - 10:57 PM

* thinks about sitting around in comfy slips *   :-)  

 

.... though I am much more familiar with the gritty feel of the turret wall and the smell that each different crag that I have gripped firmly with adrenaline, concentration, and fear, would leave, embedded in my hands, to  suddenly remind me of my experience even days later when I touched my face.

 

 

My advice is to go out and buy a good beginners drone and a couple of good cameras.  Learn about the drone, use it to the max and document your experience well on your website.  That one drone will be good for a lot of basic articles, each of which has the ability to attract visitors, demonstrate your kinship with them, educate them, and clearly demonstrate that you know what you are writing about.  Do that to set yourself squarely above the shills, kibitzers and other non-participant barkers. 

 

When you have worn that first drone well, start researching your next one - an even better one and document that work.   Go buy it and fly the devil out of it.  Again, document everything and share your success and frustrations.  If you lose that drone or crash it, document that too and post it.  Sharing that will make you brethren among the most dedicated of your visitors.  Moreover, that experience will humble you and give you empathy for your visitors who have known that same loss.   Write about it.  Go straight out and buy two more.  Fly them hard.  

 

Once you have done these things you can spend your money on comfy slips and a turret, or you can instead spend your time experimenting and writing with an obligation to the few or the many people who have grown to enjoy your website.  You will wake up on Monday, blink, and Friday will have passed by.


Edited by EGOL, 03 May 2016 - 11:00 PM.


#6 Nny777

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Posted 04 May 2016 - 05:07 AM

 

 

.... though I am much more familiar with the gritty feel of the turret wall and the smell that each different crag that I have gripped firmly with adrenaline, concentration, and fear, would leave, embedded in my hands, to  suddenly remind me of my experience even days later when I touched my face.

 

Are....are you Batman?



#7 EGOL

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Posted 04 May 2016 - 06:45 AM

 

Are....are you Batman?

 

No.  Batman is omnipotent.  He can do anything.

 

I am small, weak and vulnerable... but willing to test all that I have against the great irresistible force... seeking a sweet, but ephemeral win that brings me back where I started - to try yet again.



#8 tam

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Posted 04 May 2016 - 06:52 AM

I agree, you're going to need to get your hands on them to get good content. Once you're established manufacturers may provide free review copies, until then I'd focus on keeping your costs down - e.g. buy second hand, rent (depending what they are), buy and resell afterwards to recoup some of the outgoing. For something like drones that are prone to smashes, I'd even keep an eye out online for people with broken ones and offer postage and a few pounds - getting some dismantled pictures could give you unique content.

 

As EGOL suggests, starting with the lower end of the market is a good idea so that your initial outgoings are lower, then as the site grows you'll (hopefully) have more to spend on purchases and more chance of getting freebies. Plus, your audience can journey with you - upgrading as you go.



#9 EGOL

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Posted 04 May 2016 - 08:06 AM

starting with the lower end of the market is a good idea so that your initial outgoings are lower

 

Yes, and the market is enormous at the entry level, then narrows as you go up.



#10 EGOL

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Posted 04 May 2016 - 09:16 AM

This is a hobby.  People who are at this level can be voracious consumers of content.  Voracious.   You can often make more money from ads than from selling the product... and if you do both you can really cash in.   Note that Amazon runs ads on lots of their retail pages.

 

I'd be making content here and running adsense.  I would not be putting all of my money on retail sales or affiliate programs.  Of course, to cash in on this, you need content that is substantive in both quantity and quality.  This isn't a website that will compete well in the SERPs or satisfy the visitors if you toss up with a few paragraphs, a photo and an affiliate link.


Edited by EGOL, 04 May 2016 - 11:20 AM.


#11 optisite

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Posted 04 May 2016 - 12:14 PM

I'd be making content here and running adsense.  I would not be putting all of my money on retail sales or affiliate programs.  Of course, to cash in on this, you need content that is substantive in both quantity and quality.  This isn't a website that will compete well in the SERPs or satisfy the visitors if you toss up with a few paragraphs, a photo and an affiliate link.


Couldn't agree more, about content and the ads.  On ads, one can satisfy what the other seems to  lack....

Which brings up a very basic question that I have been keeping.

I know that Amazon lets you place their ads where there is Adense on the page (correct me if this is wrong) BUT what types of Amazon links/adds does Adsense allow?

 


Edited by optisite, 04 May 2016 - 12:14 PM.


#12 EGOL

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Posted 04 May 2016 - 12:49 PM

My reading of the Adsense rules, makes me believe that you can run Amazon ads on a webpage with Adsense.

 

I have posted Amazon ads on Adsense pages.  But I quickly took the Amazon ads down because the revenue that they produced was so low.   I also have the suspicion that running Amazon ads on my website lifted the rankings of the Amazon site in the organic SERPs where my pages compete.



#13 bobbb

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Posted 04 May 2016 - 02:57 PM

My reading of the Adsense rules, makes me believe that you can run Amazon ads on a webpage with Adsense.

That's how I read the rules also.



#14 optisite

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Posted 04 May 2016 - 03:41 PM

That's how I read the rules also.


Is that Amazon banner ads? What about text links, etc?



#15 bobbb

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Posted 04 May 2016 - 04:22 PM

That was a long time ago. I would have to read it again.

I guess what you are saying is text links could be conceived by Google to be deceptive. Deceptive as in a link to more information on the article subject but really an ad. It would be if the text link paid by click but this is not the case for Amazon links. In any case I nofollow Amazon.

 

I will try to find their rules.


Edited by bobbb, 04 May 2016 - 04:23 PM.


#16 EGOL

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Posted 04 May 2016 - 04:59 PM

 

What about text links, etc?

 

If you use text links the power of their site will soar in the SERPs and beating them will be extremely difficult.  You might not beat them on the head terms but in the long tail, even weak sites can beat Amazon.  I believe that will happen, even if the links are nofollowed.  Just my opinion based upon observation. 



#17 optisite

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Posted 04 May 2016 - 08:23 PM

...  I also have the suspicion that running Amazon ads on my website lifted the rankings of the Amazon site in the organic SERPs where my pages compete.

 

But does running Amazon ads lower our sites'  Google serp value?
Along with the detection of the required "Amazon Affiliate Disclosure"

 

... In any case I nofollow Amazon.

 

I will try to find their rules.


I was thinking of nofollow as well - along with an internal redirect (off a single page) - noticing that some Amazon links are also encrypted.

Would much appreciate !
 


Edited by optisite, 04 May 2016 - 08:28 PM.


#18 bobbb

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Posted 04 May 2016 - 10:04 PM

Found the rules but no mention. I read you can sell ads but cannot make them look like Adsense



#19 optisite

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Posted 04 May 2016 - 11:18 PM

Found the rules but no mention. I read you can sell ads but cannot make them look like Adsense


Sounds like G. Giving themselves extra added leeway.


Edited by optisite, 04 May 2016 - 11:18 PM.


#20 EGOL

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Posted 05 May 2016 - 04:26 AM

 

But does running Amazon ads lower our sites'  Google serp value?

 

I am willing to bet big money that Amazon ads on a page that was slapped up with thin or trivial content will not perform well in the Google rankings.

 

I would extend that to any recognizable affiliate program on a site with thin content or low authority as being the same as poison. 

 

That method of making money worked in the 1990's but I think Google killed it early in its history because it was so abused.



#21 optisite

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Posted 05 May 2016 - 07:44 AM

 

I am willing to bet big money that Amazon ads on a page that was slapped up with thin or trivial content will not perform well in the Google rankings.

 


But what about 'all things being equal' ... not necessarily thin content.

Say a decent ranking page to begin with had Amazon ads added.... does this fall into googles disfavor?


Edited by optisite, 05 May 2016 - 07:46 AM.


#22 EGOL

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Posted 05 May 2016 - 08:04 AM

If it's a really good page, you might get away with it. 

 

I'd use Adsense instead and make more money.



#23 optisite

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Posted 05 May 2016 - 10:01 AM

If it's a really good page, you might get away with it. 

 

I'd use Adsense instead and make more money.


You'd use adsense even on specific product reviews?

Where the site visitor is further along, to the point of purchase for that product?
 



#24 tam

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Posted 05 May 2016 - 11:07 AM

I don't think any pages with thin content are a good idea for google, and definitely not as a long term strategy, whatever ads you put on. I don't think a link out to amazon with an affiliate code on an otherwise awesome site would be an issue though and the right site and the right products it could bring an income.

 

I think the key is to pass the awesome test - is this an awesome website with great content, presented in a great way that visitors love. If so you'll have a captive audience you can test various monetising strategies on so you can see what works best and even better split your revenue streams to give you extra security.



#25 EGOL

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Posted 05 May 2016 - 11:59 AM

 

You'd use adsense even on specific product reviews?

Where the site visitor is further along, to the point of purchase for that product?

 

That is what I would do.  I am not saying that will be best for your pages.

 

You can test to find out which works best.   Each person who has a website has to decide how to place their bets.



#26 tam

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Posted 05 May 2016 - 12:35 PM

Ads do a lot of retargeting now so it may show graphical ads for products/buying sites the user is already considering/a customer of e.g. they've been looking at a drone on a big name site, come to you to check out reviews and then after reading see an ad for the product/site they were just on and you get the click through as they go back to make the buy.

 

It's going to depend on your cpc revenue v. affiliate and how it works for the specific product though.



#27 EGOL

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Posted 05 May 2016 - 12:58 PM

I have retail sites and I run Adsense on the product pages right beside the products that I sell.   I block my main direct competitors, so the ads are mostly irrelevant to what I am selling.

 

 

I make good money from these ads and I don't think that they take too many sales away from me.  Most of the people who visit do not buy.  Most of the people who visit know that there are plenty of other vendors for the products that I sell.  So, I am happy running the ads.

 

If we are really busy with retail or if we are running low on stock, I unblock ads from my direct competitors.  That allows their ads to appear, we make better money, I don't notice a drop in the sales.

 

I figure that people who are gonna buy from you are gonna buy from you and those who ain't gonna buy from you ain't gonna buy from you.





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