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How Are You Earning Backlinks For Organic Results In Google?


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#1 Profstan

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Posted 16 June 2016 - 01:47 PM

 
  • There are many updates especially after Google penguin update we are very restricted options are available for creating back links for our site.
  • I know you guys will say that we would need to focus on link earning not link building? But in practice, it is very hard to implement and after that, you get some do follow backlinks that pass some link juice towards you site.
  • I will share my inventories later on but now I request to you guys please share your practice examples how are you guys working for backlinks?  
  • Share you inventories, approaches, anything on that, in reality, you guys are working and getting some kind of advantages for organic results in Google searches. 


#2 EGOL

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Posted 18 June 2016 - 11:03 AM

The only thing that I am doing is writing articles that I hope other people will find useful.

 

I have found that if you run a good website, people will visit, return, share and recommend.

 

If you do that then linkbuilding and other types of promotion occur without any work from you.


Edited by EGOL, 23 June 2016 - 01:15 PM.


#3 fisicx

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Posted 20 June 2016 - 08:37 AM

My content ranks well without building or earning backlinks so I don't bother with them anymore.



#4 glyn

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Posted 20 June 2016 - 09:03 AM

I build links manually, sometimes with software and sometimes with software I build based on an opportunity or interest I have to test out and wanted to see what happens.

 

Nowadays I don't think that link building is in any way the most effective means to do web-marketing, but I know that after a while a big page of content will hoover up a lot of queries. In this definition I am talking about links for the goal of raising a website ranking against a keyword.

 

For the record I know from my Agency contacts that most of the online brands are sinking 10000s pounds into link building and blog outreach but they can offset all of those cra*** practices against their operating costs, and this kind of fodder is easy for agencies to sell and report back to brand managers.

 

So, to provide a flip side: When I'd finished working on a client website I had done no link building for them at all, instead I had moved them from .34 to .59 e-commerce conversion rate. That change brought them an extra 350K in revenue a year. It might not help you if you are trying to sell a service of link building but I do think today's metrics are different to those some years ago.

 

Hope this helps.

 

G.



#5 pechnet

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Posted 20 June 2016 - 09:47 AM

I see linkbuilding as short cut for low quality content and poor products. I'm not denying the impact of links but if you are starting your own business or any sort of website I would strongly recommend to focus on making your product better than figuring out how to get more links to it. If your product is crap no matter how many links none will buy it anyway. If you manage to build a product or have content that someone will find valuable to recommend, that's your linkbuilding. I know that's pretty hard job and not every product has this luxury but that's what you should aim for.

 

My favourite quote re linkbuilding is: Build your product so that it attract links by itself. Give a reason for people to link to it.

 

The example that helped me more thinking about it's Linkedin. If you think about it the product, users don't only create their own page but after they go to their sites and link to it because of the added value. Ultimately LinkedIn ranks for your name and you are supporting it with backlinks from other pages about you.

 

Another example from my current company, our product was so good to the eyes of this particular customer he/she they decided to recommend it on her/his blog (http://www.studiofai...ting-up-nicely/). Never heard of them, they didn't benefit from our referral programme, neither they are one of our affiliates. We didn't spend a single second building that link. Our product build it, I just find out about it while monitoring our backlinks.

 

 

(Full disclaimer:  I'm here as Fabrizio, any reference to my employer is not for advertising purposes)


Edited by pechnet, 20 June 2016 - 10:43 AM.


#6 Profstan

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Posted 20 June 2016 - 01:59 PM

My content ranks well without building or earning backlinks so I don't bother with them anymore.

I don't have any intention to add any irrelevant comment here. Even I don't want to promote anything for myself. I have joined this community because I am very impressed with Egol and he is stick around. So, I believe that others members are also generous here. But very sadly someone pointed that my questions sound like as I wanted to sell something here. 
 
Anyway, come to the subject I have discussed similar kind of subject at http://forums.seocha...ent-485416.html where I tried to figure our how the site can get ranked well with the content. 
  
In the above post, the poster is saying that they get ranked well on some of the keywords. So my questions are these keywords are competitive? Please show me the examples so then I can really see what is happening nowadays where I have to learn more?
 
I suggest please go with this  https://moz.com/blog...ks-google-study and add your more descriptive valuable insightful. I am sure you are the most prominent poster here as I can see you have done 3066 posts till now. 
 
It doesn't t mean I am denying the facts that the content is important factors for influencing to your users, if you create the specific content for targeted niches then they will like you, share you, promote and you don't need to worry about other promotional activities. That will be automatically influenced by this. 
 
I also completely believe that your products/service would be better than others and you need to focus more around additionally you site must have better accessibility by your audience in all machines including mobile, iPad, browsers with better speed. If you do better work on it then you don't need to think about anything else. 

Edited by Profstan, 20 June 2016 - 02:00 PM.


#7 jonbey

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Posted 20 June 2016 - 02:01 PM

There are still a lot of links you should create, because nobody else is going to do it for you. Organic search numbers go up after the link building. But, it's not all about buying links. Links in social media, local directories, and relevant websites, all help. 



#8 earlpearl

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Posted 23 June 2016 - 09:53 AM

I happened to read a very interesting piece for ViperChill the other day.  I'm not familiar with Viperchill, but I thought this particular piece analyzing the links behind 1,000 search results was very interesting and revealing.  Others might want to critique this with more depth, but it impressed me.

 

It referenced something called "natural links" and further referenced great writing and content and described how it works and evolved.  Its more or less the EGOL way described above and endlessly by EGOL.   It works.

 

Its not that applicable for every website and every entity though.  Suppose you have a website for your pasta and pizza restaurant in Leesburg Va.  Your customers are likely people who live near Leesburg and visitors to Leesburg, VA.  So long as Glyn is over in Italy or possibly back in Britain....he has ZERO interest in your web site.  Maybe less than zero.

 

Will a content strategy work????    Well, if you were going to write some kind of a food blog and simultaneously write and take pictures of your world wide famous pastas and pizzas....and that quality content was so much better than everything else....you could get tons of traffic.  You might be able to monetize your web site with ads and/or sell a cookbook etc.   So there is value.  And every so often some reader from Timbukto, or Toronto, or Tennessee might get to your restaurant.  I wouldn't depend on that last option being the make or break opportunity from the website.  

 

But mostly to get the local customers that live near Leesburg, you would need great reviews in the local media, great word of mouth, possibly local advertising, etc.  You should have a great website with terrific pictures of your restaurant and food (aka=food porn), great descriptions,  and frankly if you can build a local social or email following that can help too.   If you provide great food and service word of mouth will prevail.  

 

In those cases, also if you are the owner or the chef/owner (with great recipes)....you could be on your feet 6 days a week, in a busy kitchen, blasting out food.  Then you are also running the place, paying the bills, getting things fixed, managing the staff, etc etc etc.     Its pretty freaking difficult to have the time to write that great content about your recipes.  

 

To make a long story short....in the case of the Leesburg Pasta and Pizza place and endless other websites for topics of that nature....one has to use other methods besides great content.  



#9 iamlost

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Posted 23 June 2016 - 12:00 PM

EGOL and I and similar whose sites are their business consider our content our business. With B&M especially small/local the content is initially and possibly always a marketing strategy; however, as you note with your example it may well also be an addition to the core, i.e. cookbooks for a chef/restaurant that can expand revenue as well as marketing recognition.

The problem is convincing small business folks that marketing or marketing/expansion is worth trying. Most are narrow focus and cheap.

There is no niche where online content isn't worth doing. However, if it isn't core it probably needs to be outsourced at least in part which is costly and frightens small business control freaks.

#10 earlpearl

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Posted 23 June 2016 - 12:11 PM

EGOL and I and similar whose sites are their business consider our content our business. With B&M especially small/local the content is initially and possibly always a marketing strategy; however, as you note with your example it may well also be an addition to the core, i.e. cookbooks for a chef/restaurant that can expand revenue as well as marketing recognition.

The problem is convincing small business folks that marketing or marketing/expansion is worth trying. Most are narrow focus and cheap.

There is no niche where online content isn't worth doing. However, if it isn't core it probably needs to be outsourced at least in part which is costly and frightens small business control freaks.

I would suggest that time and energy are the two biggest impediments.  If you are on the floor, you are wiped out at the end of a shift.  I'm not sure of the control freak thing.  It plays a part...but running the smb requires a tremendous amt of time and energy.



#11 EGOL

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Posted 24 June 2016 - 12:34 PM

Four people work at my office.  Three of us are full time on content and one is full time on inventory, customer service and fulfillment.  During a few busy weeks of the year one of the content people helps with fulfillment.

 

Our focus used to be on ad revenue with two small retail sites.  A few years ago we added a third retail site and started incorporating house ads to retail pages on most of our pages that were originally intended for ad income.  The result... retail sales are up 8x and  climbing.  Now retail profits exceed ad profits and retail sales are multiples of ad revenue. 

 

I don't think that very many web retailers would put 3/4 of their labor into content.

 

And, to the original post in this thread.   We spend zero time building links.  Our visitors do that for us.


Edited by EGOL, 24 June 2016 - 12:34 PM.


#12 glyn

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Posted 27 June 2016 - 10:10 AM

EGOL I LOVE THAT POST OF YOURS!



#13 earlpearl

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Posted 27 June 2016 - 11:41 AM

EGOL and I and similar whose sites are their business consider our content our business. With B&M especially small/local the content is initially and possibly always a marketing strategy; however, as you note with your example it may well also be an addition to the core, i.e. cookbooks for a chef/restaurant that can expand revenue as well as marketing recognition.

The problem is convincing small business folks that marketing or marketing/expansion is worth trying. Most are narrow focus and cheap.

There is no niche where online content isn't worth doing. However, if it isn't core it probably needs to be outsourced at least in part which is costly and frightens small business control freaks.

 

On the small business "thing".   The other day I picked up lunch at a local restaurant.  The owner has two of them.  Among other things they have great ratings in the region for a few food types.  

 

I know the owner a bit.  I had "worked my way through one of the food types"  and I saw him sitting with a friend of his chatting.  I suggested some content to him.  His businesses are experts and he could mine his own info and create something that would be reasonably compelling and probably more compelling for this region.  His two places have remarkable reviews in many places for this type of food.

 

He'll consider it.  He has ramped up both social media and email lists.  He has told me that is working.  I'm not "in the business" I don't see his numbers, I don't handle his website or seo.   So I take him at his word.

 

Now he had the time that day to sit and chat...but I've seen him in the kitchen and I've seen him making catering deliveries.  Operators of this sort have only so much they can do. 

 

In any case, down the line I'll suggest this content idea.  He has really lots of variation opportunities on the "theme" and he has his own data to "enrich it" or give it more realness.  Its not necessarily time dependent.  Good content is pretty timeless....unless you are dealing with the Kardashians. 

 

My suspicion is that the concept of email and of social media gives him more warm and fuzzies than getting links with quality content.  Not sure that its the control element that turns him off...but I don't know.

 

We'll have our meeting at some point...and we'll see what he does.



#14 cre8pc

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Posted 28 June 2016 - 11:16 AM

What do advise site owners who do not wish to have a blog or write articles?



#15 Ken Fisher

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Posted 28 June 2016 - 04:25 PM

What to advise site owners who do not wish to have a blog or write articles?

 

 

Stay fixed in web 1.0 when brochure sites were actually looked at.

 

glyn:

 

Ditto on EGOL. I've had that same angle since day one. Changed my life. I craved creating content because I actually wanted to be a journalist in some form or anther. I love my published works: :) Thankfully some very targeted web pages I have now that were put up years ago have some links here and there. Not strong either, but they do rank for near core terms.

 

I'm seeing some movement in a few topics or new pages, thanks to a 401. First page...like the good ole days.

 

I recall EGOL mentioning a time frame that he tracks (history) in regards to SERP ranking with new pages.

 

I have enough to track  :lol:  One man band for now.

 

Good content still works, but drab won't budge past page 5-10..depending on the industry. That's where I put the average business/site owner that's almost forced to create content. They hate it, but there  could a diamond in the rough anywhere. Maybe an employee?

 

 



#16 earlpearl

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Posted 01 July 2016 - 02:35 PM

So more on this local business:   A restaurant with 2 locations.

 

The operator is an authority on some topics in the context that the operations have phenomenal ratings for certain food types.  I know the owner b/c I'm a regular and our business will order in from them at times.  Nice guy.  Two smallish operations that do some things very well.

 

He is an expert in the kitchen but all the other stuff is a challenge.  Everything;  opening a 2nd location, hiring, the changing menu, pricing, etc etc etc.  Lets say everything...though you wouldn't know it.  But the food is damn good...in his specialties.

 

So the other day we spoke about one content idea and another bubbled up.  The other one might indeed be richer and he is definitely an expert on several levels. 

 

He doesn't have to get everything done in a "jiff".  So I went through the content ideas first and he had a ton of questions.  I said get the content down first, and then we'll refine it as necessary.

 

He ended up telling me he uses Single Platform  http://singleplatform.com  They started out as a restaurant web business with the basic idea getting a restaurant's menu out in every manner on the web...for search, for social media, etc etc.  Single Platform was purchased by Constant Contact.   He has a monthly plan but they charge more for every extra.

 

But freaking nobody went to him to try and help.

 

That is fine.   Meanwhile its interesting...the whole world of marketing along with many other aspects of the business outside of the kitchen are a challenge.  He does have a money partner who takes care of that end.   There is a local marketing "trick" or detail for the region.  I've known about it for say 25 years.  It still holds.  He wasn't aware of it.  Possibly many don't know it.

 

How he got to single platform or they got to him...I don't know.  

 

In any case, the whole thing of moving from one's area of expertise into other areas is tough and difficult for all sorts of business people, let alone small brick and mortar businesses. 

 

Also I've included 4 fairly recent reviews of single platform from customers.  Make your own judgement:

 

 

3.1
68 reviews
Sort by:
Most helpful
photo.jpg
a month ago
Terrible..........charged 79.00 per month for almost a year with no demonstrated value. Then when I cancelled I was offered the program at 1/2 price and when I said no I was told they would now remove my menu's from various sites so ...More
photo.jpg?sz=40
3 months ago
I used Single Platform since my business moved 3 times in 10 years. There were different addresses and info all over the internet. They made the process easy that all the information conform and be updated. Big job! And for that they have FIVE STARS. That service was amazing. After using them a couple of years now it is not quite as useful now. I'm not fully convinced that I'm actually getting a return on my investment at this point. I plan on coming off the program soon. At this point I'm not sure that it makes sense for our business to still be using Single Platform.
photo.jpg?sz=40
2 months ago
I run a high end restaurant on Long Island and joining single platform has been one of the best decisions I have made, they stream line the menu updating process for me and ensure my information is always up to date across the web! So great, I would recommend to anyone in the industry!
photo.jpg?sz=40
4 months ago
I received a call from one of single platform reps and he was pushy enough to convince me to try them. I explained to him I already had signed up for Yext which is basically the same thing. A few hours later I decided to cancel the service and the rep I spoke to was rude. After going back and forth and explaining to him I hadn't received any service from them he said he would have to get In Contact with he's team which would be 2-3 weeks before they can decide to provide a refund. Hold up.... You can't provide a refund even if I cancelled a few hours after I signed up? They hadn't performed any service what so ever. I called constant contact who they are affiliated to and they told me they would get a hold of them to cancel my service. Never done. Do not waste your time with this company. They are convincing at first but horrible customer service. I have an email from constant contact requesting to cancel my service. I easily filled a chargeback with my CC. Idiots!

 

In any case he has two areas of expertise that are rich in the world of food and he has expertise.  He could be starting on this content.   We'll see.

 

Hey...and happy 4th to all you Yanks.   and you non Yanks too.


Edited by earlpearl, 01 July 2016 - 03:55 PM.


#17 cre8pc

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Posted 06 July 2016 - 10:36 AM

Did you see this gem?

 

Robert Ryan went 8 months and 7 days without blogging to see what the data might tell him and boy, did it have a story to tell.  A 32% drop in traffic.  Organic traffic dropped by 42%. Conversions fell by 28%. 

 

The No-Blogging Experiment Is Over!
If ever there was any doubt about whether or not blogging is important to your business I think the above makes a compelling case as to why it is vital. The drop in traffic – and ranking for my main keyword of “WordPress Developer” from 1st to 6th – shows that without putting in the time in the SEO gym you’ll slowly start to fade from Google search results. 

 

 

Overall traffic to the site saw a major decline as it fell by 32% compared to the previous 251 day period. This is a hefty drop but one that I kind of expected to see with the lack of blogging.

 



#18 glyn

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Posted 06 July 2016 - 06:05 PM

I would factor in changes in the niches marketplace, just look at travel and google search traffic. Also did the site convert less because of the change in traffic of because of a change in whatever they do. I think he is being too simplistic maybe?
Glyn

#19 EGOL

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Posted 06 July 2016 - 07:03 PM

What do advise site owners who do not wish to have a blog or write articles?

 

Tell them..... "Guy, you are on the web naked.  Write something that will prove to people that you are worthy of their business or shut down your website."



#20 fisicx

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Posted 07 July 2016 - 10:47 AM

In the above post, the poster is saying that they get ranked well on some of the keywords. So my questions are these keywords are competitive? Please show me the examples so then I can really see what is happening nowadays where I have to learn more?

They aren't necessarily competitive, but they are all highly targeted. I know exactly who I'm targeting and the sort of things they search for. It's taken many years to get this honed and optimised. I'm certainly not going to start publishing my secret sauce here.

 

Inbound links may be important in some sectors but for many, referrals and testimonials are far more effective at getting new business. and many people don't even need high volumes of traffic. A plumber for example may only need 1 good lead per day to stay in business. A web designer may only need one lead per week.

 

A great website, optimised for a niche doesn't need a link building strategy. All it needs is lots of satisfied customers who will do all the marketing for you.



#21 iamlost

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Posted 07 July 2016 - 07:50 PM

Many/most clients/webdevs/SEOs constantly worrying about backlinks tend to have two things in common:
* they believe traffic is Google.
* their site is at best a clone of every competitors' site in layout and content.
Frankly, they aren't equipped to thrive on the web.



#22 Grumpus

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Posted 11 July 2016 - 05:18 AM

What do advise site owners who do not wish to have a blog or write articles?

 

I use a real world analogy that everyone in business can understand to explain this.

 

Imagine you buy a box of business cards. If you just leave that box sitting on your desk, they won't do you any good. If you just hand them all out to everyone you meet on day one, you may get a call or two, but most of your cards will end up in a wallet never to be seen again (until the person cleans out their wallet and tosses your card into the trash). In order for your business cards to work, you need to get out there, talk to people, determine if they might have an interest in your business and, if so, give them a card.

 

And then keep doing that. Over and over, forever. The minute you stop, the chances of one of those older cards being out there and drawing a hit grow less. Even someone you "qualified" might forget they even have it.

 

Web sites are no different. If you pay us to build your web site and then it just sits there, it's like that box of business cards on your desk. If you spend a few bucks at the beginning, but don't have an ongoing marketing plan, it's like handing out your card to everyone you see on the first day. The only viable action is to come up with a plan that qualifies leads and sends them to you - every day. Over and over. Forever.

 

If you don't want to do a blog or write articles, that's fine - so long as you have some other clever idea that will achieve the same results. Blog posts and articles are a tried and true method of achieving this - getting stuff out there, keeping it fresh (minty fresh, as Google Guy used to call it back in the old days) and keeping those "business cards" moving.

 

So, if you are going to give me a few thousand dollars to get you this big box of business cards, you either need to hand them out or at least pay someone to hand them out. Of course, you don't have to, but without it, you're not likely to ever see a return on your investment.

 

Blog, post of Facebook/Twitter, interact with your customers, "do" something with the site. I don't care what, but it has to be something.

 

---

PRO TIP (to bring this back to Link Building The EGOL Way) - Supposed "no-follow" links like those on social media or links from places like this are still "links." They don't behave in the traditional sense by passing a PR value and a direct path, but there is a "new" value to these types of links. Even though the search engines aren't going to "follow" the link, they can (and do - and have been for a while, IMO) look at both ends of the link and use them to try to establish context. Google can spot a thread on Facebook that is talking about "That Idiot Donald Trump" and look at the links to all the videos and memes and articles from within the discussion and assume they are about Trump or maybe some representation of "Trump being an idiot." When it looks at the page on the other side of the link, it can use unfollowed, but existing link to build context - this page or video or graphic is "of interest to those who think Trump is an idiot."

 

SUPER PRO TIP: The content and the links you put on your page to other things are what "you" are saying your page is about. The content and the links on pages that link to you are what "others" are saying your page is about. The magic in SEO right now comes down to somehow managing to keep both sides balanced and being in agreement - with both "you" and "others" saying, at least for the most part, that this page is about a certain thing. This is why "irrelevant" links can hurt you. There isn't really a penalty, but it's just a bit of evidence that confuses the context, so there needs to be more corroborating evidence (i.e. links that do validate the actual topic) before the engine can confirm the actual topic. And, of course, if all your links are just coming in from other sites and properties you run, then it's not balanced either - even if they are on topic. It's about "you" and what "others" say it's about, not just you.

 

Keep that in mind when you write your blog posts. You absolutely want to write something that is going to generate discussion (and links), but nowadays you also want to make sure that it's going to inspire a relevant discussion. If you're saying that your page is about "Trump for President" but every conversation on the web which links to it is saying, "Trump is an Idiot" all Google will be able to confirm is that it is about "Trump" but there's conflicting information about whether the page is about Trump being a good presidential candidate or about him being an idiot.

 

G.





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