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How People Use Mobile Devices As Per Google


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#1 cre8pc

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Posted 27 October 2016 - 10:18 AM

I've been researching demographics and technology for the past few weeks and this new article out by Google seems a bit skewed.

 

How People Use Their Devices

 

Nearly 40% of people search only on a smartphone in an average day as they look to meet immediate needs.2 As a result of this shift, more Google searches are happening on smartphones than computers.

 

 

By "people", they mean Android users ages 18 - 49 who search with Google.

 

Sources
1,2 Google Data, “How People Use Their Devices,” based on convenience sample of opt-in U.S. cross-device users, ages 18–49 who signed into Google and turned on Location History (mobile Android-only and IE/Chrome/Firefox desktop browser); calibrated to population studied, Jan. 2016–Mar. 2016; location analysis excludes locations that are not identifiable; apps include browser apps; search includes Google Search only; 

 

 

Am I understanding this correctly?  Because if so, this is misleading but I'm seeing SEO's and internet marketers sharing this article and also there's the recent emphasis on "design and market for young people" and smart phones.  

 

Which is why I've been gathering data.  Millions of us over age 49 are still here.

 

 



#2 EGOL

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Posted 27 October 2016 - 12:57 PM

I can believe that a lot of people use their smart phones for search. 

 

I use my smart phone for search while watching TV, talking with people, in stores, waiting for appointments, at airports, in cars, when I see an unfamiliar bird or bug on a hike.  When I have been in NYC and LA I see everybody everywhere on their mobile phone.

 

One thing that Google might not be saying is that when they talk about mobile phone use they are talking global.   A lot of people outside of the USA use mobile phones exclusively.  Phones are their only connection to the internet.

 

On my main website about 1/3 of the pageviews are on mobile phones but those visitors produce just 1/7 of the revenue.

 

On my retail sites, mobile is now up to about 1/7 of my sales and those visitors want to use PayPal so they don't have to fill out credit card info, billing and shipping address - it is already in their paypal account.



#3 earlpearl

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Posted 27 October 2016 - 01:38 PM

I've been researching demographics and technology for the past few weeks and this new article out by Google seems a bit skewed.

 

How People Use Their Devices

 

 

By "people", they mean Android users ages 18 - 49 who search with Google.

 

 

Am I understanding this correctly?  Because if so, this is misleading but I'm seeing SEO's and internet marketers sharing this article and also there's the recent emphasis on "design and market for young people" and smart phones.  

 

Which is why I've been gathering data.  Millions of us over age 49 are still here.

 

 

Kim:   Thanks for including the data source and details.  That skewing is relevant.

 

I can believe that a lot of people use their smart phones for search. 

 

I use my smart phone for search while watching TV, talking with people, in stores, waiting for appointments, at airports, in cars, when I see an unfamiliar bird or bug on a hike.  When I have been in NYC and LA I see everybody everywhere on their mobile phone.

 

One thing that Google might not be saying is that when they talk about mobile phone use they are talking global.   A lot of people outside of the USA use mobile phones exclusively.  Phones are their only connection to the internet.

 

On my main website about 1/3 of the pageviews are on mobile phones but those visitors produce just 1/7 of the revenue.

 

On my retail sites, mobile is now up to about 1/7 of my sales and those visitors want to use PayPal so they don't have to fill out credit card info, billing and shipping address - it is already in their paypal account.

 

I use mobile search like EGOL.  Of course if I see an unfamiliar bug on a hike I'd probably squash it.  I can believe its used widely and in various parts of the world its the only source to the internet...for all those folks without access to desktops or laptops.

 

Kim:   On the "local side"....I think the CURRENT stats suggest that mobile search is around or near 50%.  (I need to check those stats.  I could be off)  Local has been described as 1/3 of all searches.    Where is the nearest restaurant, bar, pawn shop, theater, etc etc.

 

Since mobile took off one of the terms with widest growth is "xxxx near me"   xxx could be bar, hotel, shoe store, anything.     I was answering the phone for one of our smb's and new lead called in.  He told me the search term he used-->   "our service" near me.      For local smb's the near me phrase has exploded....from nothing...but its used a good bit now.....and for everything.   its a mobile phenomena.  

 

Anyways my mobile usage is not part of that study.  I'm over 49 and I use an IOS.....but frankly it mirrors what the survey suggests.



#4 iamlost

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Posted 27 October 2016 - 01:46 PM

It is a very limited subset of a subset. I find it amusing that they specifically did NOT include iOS users. Nor non-signed in to G users. Nor.,, Personally I'd not use that data as it smells like carefully selected to make a marketing point data.

That SEO types are running with it is no surprise as (1) most are not SEO but GO practitioners, and (2) most haven't a clue about data or statistics or analytics except what they are spoon fed or tool told.

:) Thus ends my rant for the moment.

#5 EGOL

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Posted 27 October 2016 - 02:53 PM

Duh...  what's a "GO practitioner"?   :-)



#6 jonbey

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Posted 27 October 2016 - 03:21 PM

Well, it is not unusual when carrying out market research to "question" only the people you are interested in questioning. 

 

Anyway, Android users account for about 80% of all mobile users. The market segmentation may not include you, but as far as business is concerned, it's a useful one to have!



#7 iamlost

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Posted 28 October 2016 - 08:18 AM

Duh...  what's a "GO practitioner"?   :-)

GO => Google Optimiser.

Not ever to be confused with Search Engine Optimiser... :infinite-banana: :infinite-banana: :infinite-banana: :banana_wgun:



#8 earlpearl

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Posted 28 October 2016 - 08:42 AM

GO => Google Optimiser.

Not ever to be confused with Search Engine Optimiser... :infinite-banana: :infinite-banana: :infinite-banana: :banana_wgun:

 

Yeah, I'm sick of the GO's.  



#9 cre8pc

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Posted 31 October 2016 - 09:44 AM

Google has an agenda.  

 

If you're investing in AI, for example, you don't want to waste any time, resources or effort in people, behaviors and things that are not ready for it, against it, won't be alive when it becomes mainstream or are too poor to afford it.

 

This has been bothering me for awhile.  Google lives in the land of make believe.  



#10 iamlost

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Posted 31 October 2016 - 11:46 AM

Kim,

There is a great deal of term abuse, particularly in our business and especially with SEOs and in regard to Google. Yes, Google and others mostly in academia have been and are investing in both machine learning and artificial intelligence research.

The two are NOT synonymous.

Currently what Google is using in production is ALL machine learning.
Currently what Google is doing in development is ALL machine learning.
Currently what Google is doing in research is ALL machine learning - attempting to reach AI.
Actual AI is years if not decades away - despite media hype.
Note: an interesting query is, which will be accomplished first, practical fusion power or practical AI?

So, please write and say 'machine learning'; please stop writing and saying 'artificial intelligence' except in the 0.001% of instances where the term actually is applicable.

Not that AI actually exists as yet but to put the two in perspective:
As:
All cognac is brandy, not all brandy is cognac.
So:
All AI is machine learning, not all machine learning is AI.

Note: barring cyborgs.

Machine learning is actually quite cool - but too often a box even blacker than the Google algo as at the end of many/most experiments the researchers have absolutely no idea how the computer reached the decisions.
Slight problem there!!! if they are already loosing control of the process.

Note: development/production machine learning systems are not confined to academia or enterprise organisations. I have production MLSes behind my bot defences and my visitor id system plus one in development to better handle contextual delivery. Nothing overtly spectacular but awesome productivity gains for a time crunched sole webdev. If iamlost can do it anyone can!

 

And it's fun! :)

Roll over, Rover!

Shake a paw, Spot!

:infinite-banana: :infinite-banana: :infinite-banana:


Edited by iamlost, 31 October 2016 - 11:49 AM.


#11 cre8pc

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Posted 31 October 2016 - 12:49 PM

Self driving cars = machine learning?

 

I use the terms I'm seeing used elsewhere. This was a search for "examples of AI".

 

http://www.cs.umb.ed...plications.html

 

I
s artificial intelligence machine learning?
Machine learning is a subfield of computer science that evolved from the study of pattern recognition and computational learning theory in artificial intelligence. In 1959, Arthur Samuel defined machine learning as a "Field of study that gives computers the ability to learn without being explicitly programmed".

 

AI (Artificial intelligence) is a subfield of computer science that was created in the 1960s, and it was/is concerned with solving tasks that are easy for humans but hard for computers. In particular, a so-called Strong AI would be a system that can do anything a human can (perhaps without purely physical things). This is fairly generic and includes all kinds of tasks such as planning, moving around in the world, recognizing objects and sounds, speaking, translating, performing social or business transactions, creative work (making art or poetry), etc.

 

 


Edited by cre8pc, 31 October 2016 - 12:55 PM.


#12 iamlost

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Posted 31 October 2016 - 01:05 PM

Yah, I know. The problem is that we are almost as far from meeting those definitions now as then. However 'AI' is short and sounds great and there's a movie and the marketing types have happily snowed the media types. All those 'human only' things are still human only. We have machine learning which can mirror slightly some of what we can 'human behaviour' but it is so constricted and so directed that it is not actually.

 

AI is popularly as outside what it really is as is SEO among webdevs. The majority is often wrong. :)

 

If you go with the flow that's fine, one more burr among zillions that irritate me. :banana_wgun:



#13 cre8pc

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Posted 31 October 2016 - 01:16 PM

My Dad is a real stickler for proper definitions and getting the facts correct (and no B.S. ever).  When I see him on Thanksgiving, I'll have some fun getting his opinions.  That is, if I understand him...he's really smart.  Mostly goes over my head kind of smart  :blushing:



#14 Grumpus

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Posted 02 November 2016 - 04:10 AM

 

AI (Artificial intelligence) is a subfield of computer science that was created in the 1960s,

 

Maybe as a term. Isaac Asimov was exploring the ideas in the 1940's and no class in AI is complete without taking a look at the Three Laws of Robotics.

 

Back to the original topic though....

 

 

Nearly 40% of people search only on a smartphone in an average day as they look to meet immediate needs.

 

This number is skewed, and it's fairly easy to spot where.

 

Everyone has their own phone, but there are typically only one or two non mobile devices per family (though I suppose that number is changing somewhat with laptops being cheaper). Most families don't change over to new users every time someone sits down at a computer. If the husband is logged into Google and searches for the football scores and then the wife sits down to look up what's playing at the cinema this weekend - then, as far as Google is concerned, only 50% of this household did a search on their desktop today. The wife didn't bother to log in as herself before performing the search - why would she? Add a kid into the mix and you have that 40% number.

 

Sure - smart phone searching is up because, well, because more people have smart phones. I'm not sure I can remember a happy hour in recent months where someone didn't jump onto their phone to look up something - Who was that guy in that movie? What's the name of that song? And so on.

 

Still, the data is skewed by at least some measure because phones are assigned to individuals but home computers are typically representational of families. People sitting at their desktop are likely only to log into their own Google account if they want some information, email, or files stored under that account. For immediate needs, though, you simply search and go.

 

 

Am I understanding this correctly?  Because if so, this is misleading but I'm seeing SEO's and internet marketers sharing this article

 

Not surprising. If someone has compiled data in such a way as to further your agenda, you use it.

 

The trick is that you can take data and make it say just about anything you want. If you look at Global Warming data, they go back about 150 or so years and show a warming trend of a degree or two every hundred years. If I go back much further, I can generate data which says we are actually cooling - by as much as about 3,500 degrees if I go back far enough.

 

We need to be careful here. Just because data exists, it doesn't mean that the conclusion being drawn is useful nor accurate. For example, with this data, we could easily say that iPhones are pretty dangerous.

 

apple-iphone-sales_people-who-died-by-falling-down-the-stairs.png

 

The data in this example is wholly accurate. As iPhone sales go up, so do deaths by falling down the stairs. Is it true that this correlation is meaningful? Nope. But for my purposes (that of convincing you that you need to be wary of the conclusions people draw from data) it suits nicely. Why wouldn't I share it?

 

In marketing, it's hard to sell people something they already have. It's far easier to sell them something they don't. Everyone has a web site - but do they have a mobile friendly web site? Probably not. So now, I find this article which has God - erm, I mean Google - saying that you need a mobile web site, you can bet I'm going to share it. It suits my agenda. I don't care if it's accurate, I just care about whether it might help to compel you to purchase what I'm selling.

 

Humans have a need to believe in something. Early man, with limited understanding of the way things work, chose to believe in God in one form or another. Now, with a slightly better understanding of how things work, we are tending to put our faith in science and data. Both are equally misguided, in my opinion. It's not the science or the data that is flawed - we know the number of iPhone sales and we know the number of people who fall down stairs and die. The flaw lies in how the data gets interpreted. (I suppose this isn't much different from religion - it's not the word of [your chosen] God that is particularly flawed - it's how the word is interpreted.)

 

G.

 

P.S. If anyone needs scientific data and statistics to further their agenda, please feel free to contact me. With the proper budget and enough time, I can turn just about anything into an absolute truth. And I've got data to back up that claim.



#15 bobbb

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Posted 02 November 2016 - 10:13 AM

If the husband is logged into Google and searches for the football scores and then the wife sits down to look up what's playing at the cinema this weekend - then, as far as Google is concerned, only 50% of this household did a search on their desktop today. The wife didn't bother to log in as herself before performing the search - why would she? Add a kid into the mix and you have that 40% number.

Why would you want to log on to search? I'm presuming to access his gmail a bit before but he would log off so the wife and kids or anyone else in the house do not read his email. But I get it. Google's data is full of ....

 

I also get it that just your IP gives Google your ID.



#16 earlpearl

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Posted 02 November 2016 - 10:21 AM

Why would you want to log on to search? I'm presuming to access his gmail a bit before but he would log off so the wife and kids or anyone else in the house do not read his email. But I get it. Google's data is full of ....

 

I also get it that just your IP gives Google your ID.

 

That is the reason inside a family group.  If everyone is using the same computer and I want to keep my emails separate and some data separate I need to log in separately from the wife and kids and so do they.  (and of course everyone needs to log off after using the device.)



#17 Grumpus

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Posted 02 November 2016 - 10:44 AM

<shrug> Anywhere I've been, step one of checking mail at a family computer is to log out whomever was on last. Maybe that's a New England thing. lol



#18 bobbb

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Posted 02 November 2016 - 12:13 PM

Not sure if we are talking Windows login or gmail/hotmail/etcMail login on a family computer

 

I meant Google gmail account since we were talking about Google stats.





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