Jump to content

Cre8asiteforums

Discussing Web Design & Marketing Since 1998

  • Announcements

    • cre8pc

      Thank you! Cre8asiteforums 1998 - 2018   01/18/2018

      Internet Marketing Ninjas released many of the online forums they had acquired, such as WebmasterWorld, SEOChat, several DevShed properties and these forums back to their founders. You will notice a new user interface for Cre8asiteforums, the software was upgraded, and it was moved to a new server. Thank you for your support as we turn 20 years old.  
cre8pc

Update Your Copyright Year

Recommended Posts

Just a reminder that if you don't have your copyright year updated for the new year, it's time to do so :infinite-banana::infinite-banana::infinite-banana:

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

After all the years I've been online and I STILL never switched over to this.

 

Thanks for the bop on the head!

 

:emo_gavel::emo_gavel::manicure:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Careful...

 

Before I go off on this, let me say that the copyright statement on your site is virtually useless because almost no one does it properly. So, no matter what, it's not really going to be enough to establish copyright in any court. That said, the main reason to update your copyright date to the current year is so that when a user scrolls down to find out if the site is regularly updated, it's got the current year. A copyright that is 5 years old doesn't give much confidence that the information being presented is still valid - even though technically, a 5 year old copyright on a site that hasn't been changed in 5 years IS likely to be accurate.

 

Okay. That out of the way...

 

Be careful if you really want to do it right.

 

If your site has a line that reads, "Copyright 2014 My Website - All Rights Reserved" and I download a copy of your site. Then 2015 comes around, and you change it to read "Copyright 2015 My Web Site - All Rights Reserved" - you've opened yourself up to troubles. Your site suggests your copyright is from 2015, and the copy I have says it's from 2014. My copy is BEFORE yours, so therefore, I could (theoretically) make a case that I have the copyright and YOU stole it from me. If that tagline was all there was involved, I'd win. My date is before yours. Plain and simple.

 

A copyright date is the FIRST date of publication, not the current. Web sites are a little different because they are updated frequently.

 

Your tagline should read "Copyright 2001-2015 - All Rights Reserved" with the 2001 being the first year you opened. A line like this indicates that the site has had revisions during EVERY year in between 2001 and 2015, too, though. If you only update every other year, for example, it should read "Copyright 2001, 2003, 2005, 2007, 2009 [etc] - All rights reserved". The copyright legend should only include years where things have actually changed on your site.

 

In theory, you shouldn't change the date line in your site until after you've made some sort of change to the copy. If you go in today and change the date, but haven't changed any copy, exactly what are you claiming right to? You already claimed right to what's there.

 

Again, none of it "really" matters because no one does it right, and most people don't even bother filing even a poor man's copyright for their site content. BUT... if you want to do it right, DO NOT just change the year to the current year. No matter what, copyrights aren't about being current, it's about "who did it FIRST" - and your first year in the copyright line is far more important than your second year. Unless your web site is less than 1 year old, there NEEDS to be two years. The "First" year (the most important) and the "Last Year Changes/Revisions were made".

 

Be careful, too, if you happen to have older things on a newer site. Maybe you created a new site to feature articles you wrote back in the 1990's. If you have a web site copyright that says the current year, and then you publish an article from 1992, you have copy on there that is from BEFORE the date of your copyright claim - thus that article is technically not copyrighted (at least by any claim you've made). If you have older things like this, you need to adjust your site copyright line to include the year of the first bit of copy you want to claim rights on - OR, just put "This article is copyright 1992" on that specific page.

 

It's not about getting your copyright to the "current' year. Remember that.

 

G.

  • Like 4

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

What Grumpus said.

If it should get before a court or even as part of a DMCA or similar dispute it could cost you big time in aggrevation if nothing else.

 

Technically, there is no need to 'declare' copyright, the act of publication is sufficient. BUT. HOWEVER. See above. PLUS a saved timestamped copy is a minimal best practice.

 

For most webdevs copyright infringement is a matter of chasing republishers out of search engines, AdSense, etc. For others the value is in the content at least as much as in immediate traffic/revenue; if that is the case then actually registering is critical as that is often (especially in the US) a requirement if after costs/damages.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Wow. Okay then.

 

For me, the copyright indicates that somebody is at home. Outdated sites signal that they are not kept up to date or current.

 

Thank you!!! :infinite-banana::infinite-banana:

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
<p class="copyright">Copyright © 1995-<?php echo date("Y"); ?> - My Cool Web Site - All Rights Reserved</p>
 

That handles both. Obviously, replace the start year with the first year of the web site. Also, it seems to me that if we're looking at it as a means to show the site is updated, then you have to consider that the first year as the starting date shows "how long we've lived here" as much as the second year shows that someone is home in the first place.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Well. Yes on all the above, but after working in copyright for 2 years (not a long time I know) I can tell you that it's all about the lawers in the end, heck they even invented perpetual copyright! When the beatles catalogue of music is just about to enter the public domain something new will be invented to protect the rights holders. Money 1, public domain 0.

 

G.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

BUMP!

 

To remind myself :dazed:

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hi! I think this may possibly be my first reply in all of Cre8asite! :wavey:

 

I stumbled upon this particular post months ago and it's stayed fresh in mind ever since. I came across a few lines of code last night that may be helpful to some... http://updateyourfooter.com/. I'm no expert by any means so if it's crap then please tell it like it is. :lol: From where I'm at now though, a dynamic timestamp seems like a pretty brilliant idea.

 

Anyhow, that's about it for my first aim to be helpful. Bye-bye :wub:

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Lol. Good to see you uncloak.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks for the reminders, Kim. And I'll investigate the dynamic timestamp idea that Kristin recommended above. I want to make sure it's accepted on all devices without interrupting any code on the many websites I manage.

Here's to a thriving 2018 for you all.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Greetings, jlfaverio....

On 12/18/2017 at 4:32 PM, jlfaverio said:

Thanks for the reminders, Kim. And I'll investigate the dynamic timestamp idea that Kristin recommended above. I want to make sure it's accepted on all devices without interrupting any code on the many websites I manage.


The PHP solution (if you have the ability to do that) will work on all devices. It's executed on the server side so the browser or spider has no idea if it's dynamic or hand written. The trick will be in how your CMS is set to handle it. If you are using Wordpress - most themes don't have that built in - you just write a copyright notice out, but it won't execute PHP functions. You COULD skip that function in the theme and alter the theme template footer.php file itself, though. Most of them (if they are using standard WP parsing features) will execute the stuff between the <script> tags right in the editor window, though.

The javascript examples will work so long as the device has javascript enabled - which is almost all of them. Even big dumb Googlebot can parse javascript like the examples given in the link above. That said - it still executes on the browser, so it's not quite as desirable as the PHP option - it serves our user centric goals just fine.

Remember, though - the only reason we're updating our copyright date is to make the site look maintained and fresh for users. If it's the actual copyright we're worried about - it's really only the first start date that is important. (Copyright is about establishing ownership first, not last). If your site has an updated copyright, yet the last blog post is from 2012 and all the site information is just as old, the user will pick up on those signals just as easily (and probably with more impact) than picking up on a stale copyright year.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Quote

Remember, though - the only reason we're updating our copyright date is to make the site look maintained and fresh for users. If it's the actual copyright we're worried about - it's really only the first start date that is important. (Copyright is about establishing ownership first, not last). If your site has an updated copyright, yet the last blog post is from 2012 and all the site information is just as old, the user will pick up on those signals just as easily (and probably with more impact) than picking up on a stale copyright year.

Worth repeating. This is why it is a heuristic in my site audits. :D

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now


×